The Readers' Corner - Page 4 - Keira Knightley.com Forums
Keira Knightley.com Forums  

Go Back   Keira Knightley.com Forums > Wavefront Community > General Discussion

General Discussion Talk about pretty much anything.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-06-2008, 04:41 AM   Senior Registered Member #61
michael22
eternally screwed
 
michael22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 843
I just picked up two archeology text books for a really good price, two were just reference books that were on sale and my friend just dropped out of it to be an accoutant ( I wonder why I hang out with him ) so he gave me his old ones for twenty dollars. They are quite an interesting read.

I also just got the zombie survival guide, funny but with some interesting socil commentary.
__________________
88 member of the KK posse, A high powered mutant of some kind to weird to live, to rare to die.-Hunter. S. Thompson
The concept of wuv confuses and infuriates us -lurgh
michael22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2008, 10:25 PM   KKWiki Contributer Senior Registered Member #62
Ranman
KKW's Therapist
 
Ranman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Traveling the world
Posts: 2,064
Quote:
Originally Posted by michael22 View Post
I just picked up two archeology text books for a really good price,.
I picked up a archeology book too. Indiana Jones and his boner of doom. A lot of great pics.
__________________
My mother told me every girl wants my body, and moms don't lie.
Ranman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-06-2008, 07:30 PM   #63
Elizabethine
Member
 
Elizabethine's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surprize View Post
I see that rather many people say that they have read Pride and Ptejudice. I read it last week but I think the film was more interesting.
I think it is hard to say if the book or the film is better....but I think books are always better....you can imagine the characters...like they lookalike...how they are talking, with how accent....and everything...in film..you see like characters lookalike...how they are talking........ and i feel injured that SOMEONE thinks that we don´t read.....I´ve just started to read historc books (especially about 2.ww) but I adore novels like Jane Eyre (Emma and P&P of course) and now I started to read Shakespeare´s playes
__________________
Kiss me chancly, always I want..Hold me lovely, don´t ever go.... Avril Lavigne HOT
Elizabethine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-06-2008, 06:47 PM   #64
eelliiinn
Member
 
eelliiinn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 298
Ive just finished reading "The it girl" by Cecily von Ziegesar, it's a follow-up to the Gossip Girl series. I really like this book , but its a bit confusing in the beginning when you dont know the characters and suddenly youre reading about what happens in their lifes, and i was like: "hey, slow down, who is this guy?" Anyway it's good and if you like the gossip girl books you have to read this one!
__________________
Don't fear death, fear the unlived life.
eelliiinn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-06-2008, 11:45 AM   #65
Surprize
Member
 
Surprize's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: in your dreams
Posts: 519
I'm reading a fantasy book of a Russian writer, nothing special, that's why I want to read it to the end faster.
I also read The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes in English to develop my knowlege and make one more step to master the language. I have already read 20 small pages and it was difficult. More than 200 new words, confusing
Btw, I don't know why but in my view S. Holmes is very similar to Ice, lol
Surprize is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-06-2008, 09:38 PM   Lifetme Service Award Officer #66
Leonie
Elle
 
Leonie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Nottingham
Posts: 2,631
Recently read:

Under the Tuscan Sun, Frances Mayes. Loved it. The narrative isn't particularly thrilling, but it's a nice book to give you a flavour of Italy. Reading it whilst in Italy may have helped. My parents both thought it too boring to finish, so the jury is still out on whether it is actually good.

The Secret of Lost Things
, Sheridan Hay. Loved reading it, it's a book drenched in the love of books. I was a little disappointed by the ending though, it seemed rather abrupt and anticlimactic. It's good 7/8ths of the way, the last bit is forgettable. Decently written, though.

On Chesil Beach, Ian McEwan. I'm a bit divided as far as this one goes. So much history had to be worked into the present story of two newlyweds that I got a little bored at times. I didn't really care for the main characters, perhaps because McEwan is always frighteningly accurate in his observations on human behaviour, making for slightly uncomfortable reading. The last chapter is brilliant, and I like the way the story was set up, but the execution was a bit yawn-worthy at times. That said, I'm just happy it wasn't freakish like the Cement Garden, which was off-putting and plain gross.

I'm 4/5ths of the way through The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon of Kavalier & Clay fame. Loving it. It's an exciting detective story based on the premise that Israel failed and Jews have relocated to Alaska instead. Set months before the "reversion", when the Alaskan land will be returned to America, it is absolutely fantastic. It's a slightly easier read than Kavalier & Clay, mostly because the detective story aspect of it all makes for a very lively, fast-paced narrative. It's funny, too. Basically, it's just an incredibly well-written traditional detective novel, with some Chabonesque quirks as far as setting and characters goes. Can't wait to see how it ends, but kind of don't want to finish it.
__________________
Leonie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2008, 09:57 AM   Attended an OMGWTFKKWBBQ! Moderator #67
duckula
Nobler in the mind.
 
duckula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,214
I've just finished Emma, thought it was time to read another Austen. As with Pride & Prejudice it was brilliantly observed and funny, a damn good read all in all.

Next up is a book of essays called Future Armies, Future Challenges about the changing nature of warfare. Looks to be an interesting read.
duckula is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2008, 10:58 AM   #68
luis
Member
 
luis's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 76
i read the last monds

ludlum, bourne idenity

bob evers 1-32(dutch books)

eragon1-2

the da vince code
__________________
omg i can has apple omg
luis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2008, 12:50 PM   First Class Member KKWiki Contributer Senior Registered Member #69
hasselbrad
Senior Citizen
 
hasselbrad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Sugar Hill, GA... finally! Civilization!
Posts: 4,590
I just read my divorce papers. I think I'm going to have to go back to court.
__________________
"Purgatory's kind of like the in-betweeny one. You weren't really shit, but you weren't all that great either. Like Tottenham."
I'll try being nicer...if you'll try being smarter.
hasselbrad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-07-2008, 11:03 PM   #70
Keira lover
Member
 
Keira lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Red Hook, NY (small town approx. 100mi from NYC)
Posts: 342
Just finished a book about Augustus, called AUGUSTUS
__________________
I believe that whatever doesn't kill you simply...makes you...stranger.

47th Member of the Keira Knightley Posse
Keira lover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-07-2008, 02:31 PM   #71
luis
Member
 
luis's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 76
i read

ludlum,
the osterman weekend

and ludlum,
the the icarus agenda
__________________
omg i can has apple omg
luis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2008, 11:28 PM   Senior Registered Member #72
Porcelain_Doll
little-miss-smut-for-brains
 
Porcelain_Doll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: River of Painted Birds
Posts: 1,429
I've just finished "Mistress in the art of death", by Ariana Franklin.

I loved it, her main character is a Middle Ages Dr Brennan (from "Bones", just in case). The first chapters are a bit slow but the rest is great. It must've been awful hard creating a wild, CSI-like chase of a psycho children murderer, complete with racism and female doctors in a twelfth century Cambridge, and she pulls it off brilliantly. Awesome.
__________________
"There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of either merit or sense." Elizabeth Bennet

musings and ramblings, aka:
my blog





Porcelain_Doll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2008, 12:18 AM   First Class Member KKWiki Contributer Senior Registered Member #73
hasselbrad
Senior Citizen
 
hasselbrad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Sugar Hill, GA... finally! Civilization!
Posts: 4,590
Quote:
Originally Posted by Porcelain_Doll View Post
I've just finished "Mistress in the art of death", by Ariana Franklin.

I loved it, her main character is a Middle Ages Dr Brennan (from "Bones", just in case). The first chapters are a bit slow but the rest is great. It must've been awful hard creating a wild, CSI-like chase of a psycho children murderer, complete with racism and female doctors in a twelfth century Cambridge, and she pulls it off brilliantly. Awesome.
Have you ever read The Alienist by Caleb Carr? It's a 19th Century psychiatrist (alienist) and his associates on the trail of a serial killer. I shall have to find your recommendation.
__________________
"Purgatory's kind of like the in-betweeny one. You weren't really shit, but you weren't all that great either. Like Tottenham."
I'll try being nicer...if you'll try being smarter.
hasselbrad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-08-2008, 06:46 AM   #74
Hollysince1985
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Portnoy's Complaint by Philip Roth

Hilarious!!!!!!
  Reply With Quote
Old 14-08-2008, 08:15 AM   #75
Ameriel
Newcomer
 
Ameriel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Poland
Posts: 29
I've just finished 'The world according to Garp' by John Irving.
It's a story about a young writer, his weird thoughts and his whole life. It's cool
__________________
Chill out!
Ameriel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-08-2008, 08:35 PM   Senior Registered Member #76
Porcelain_Doll
little-miss-smut-for-brains
 
Porcelain_Doll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: River of Painted Birds
Posts: 1,429
Quote:
Originally Posted by hasselbrad View Post
Have you ever read The Alienist by Caleb Carr? It's a 19th Century psychiatrist (alienist) and his associates on the trail of a serial killer. I shall have to find your recommendation.
Niiiice, I'll look it up!

Just finished "Blood and Chocolate". I know the movie's crap, but it has nothing to do with the book. I really enjoyed it, the author's brilliant. It's funny how she makes you realise humans have so much of beasts in them, you end up favouring the wonderful dual nature of werewolves. At least they can let their demons run free and hence get rid of them, as a character points out.
Easily one of my favourites.
__________________
"There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of either merit or sense." Elizabeth Bennet

musings and ramblings, aka:
my blog





Porcelain_Doll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2008, 01:06 AM   Senior Registered Member #77
Richard
Dated
 
Richard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: California
Posts: 1,306
Deadly Illusions: Jean Harlow and the Murder of Paul Bern by Samuel Marx and Joyce Vanderveen.

The author of this book, Samuel Marx, once worked as story editor for MGM studios in the early 1930s, and it was during this period when he met and became friends with Paul Bern, then one of the studio's most popular and successful producers. During his days as an office boy for Universal Pictures, Marx had also met and befriended the soon-to-be famous producer Irving Thalberg, and it was Thalberg who hired Marx as story editor for MGM studio when he arrived there in 1930. Thalberg would eventually become one of the most famous film producers of his time before his untimely death in 1936.

The year is 1932, the morning after the Labor Day weekend when Marx received a telephone call informing him that his producer-friend Paul Bern, who was married to Jean Harlow at the time, was found dead in his home, an apparent suicide from a self-inflicted gunshot wound. When Marx arrived at the scene he found several of his colleagues were already there, including Thalberg, Louis B. Mayer and MGM's publicist Howard Strickling. Marx became suspicious when he learned that these men were at the house hours before the police were even notified.

Upon further reading we discover that Paul Bern was once married to a woman he knew and met long ago (during his theater days as an actor), and that this woman was mentally ill. Her name was Dorothy Millette, a stage actress who somehow became very sick and had to be institutionalized. Bern kept this secret from almost everyone he knew except for a select few; probably those he was very close to and trusted. We discover that Dorothy has now been released and is spending most of her time at a hotel in Sacramento. She begins to taunt Bern, who at this time is seen courting a young Jean Harlow, and expresses a desire to come back into his life and continue her aspiration to become an actress. In Dorothy's mind only a night has past, but in reality she has been in a coma for almost a decade. Marx claims that Bern was worried about how to handle the situation but seemed fine the last time he saw him.

The public knew nothing about this Dorothy Millette and it didn't reach newspapers until days after Bern's death. When it finally did reach the newspapers a nationwide search was conducted to locate the whereabouts of this mystery woman, and all that witnesses seem to know was that she was last seen on the Delta King, a steamboat that traveled between Sacramento and San Francisco. Dorothy Millette's belongings were left behind and never picked up, and she never got off the boat when it docked in Sacramento. Nobody knew what happened to her. All evidence pointed to suicide and people believed she jumped. A short time later her body was found in the Sacramento River.

Samuel Marx never believed the motive that became almost synonymous whenever someone mentioned the name Paul Bern; the man who killed himself because he couldn't make it with Jean Harlow, the man who was impotent. Marx claimed that Dorothy Millette -- her side, her story -- was more important than most people at the time were willing to let on. The triangle that made up the mystery, Marx claims, consisted of Paul, Dorothy and Harlow. Two of whom died the same year with Jean Harlow having only five more years left to live before dying of uremic poisoning in 1937. Marx also suspected a cover-up by the hands of certain figures at the MGM studio, a cover-up to withdraw any evidence that would create a scandal or tarnish the reputation of their young blonde bombshell, then on the rise of becoming one of the studio's biggest stars.

It is nice to read a book about something based on real events and knowing that the author himself was there and knew the people involved. But if you're truly immersed in the book you'll notice that there are some things which are almost entirely speculated upon and impossible to prove for the simple reason that both parties who were involved are dead. Nevertheless, Marx presents a credible argument to something that very well may have been a Hollywood myth all these years. I don't want to give anything away. It is such an engrossing book so read it. The final chapter is a jaw-dropping and utterly convincing finale to a good mystery. *** out of ****
__________________
"As a human being, I don't suppose I have any real individuality. I'm the people I've met; I'm a mixture of everything I've ever read or seen. I'm everyone I've ever loved."
My blog: All Things Classic

Last edited by Richard; 20-06-2009 at 10:49 PM.
Richard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2008, 11:39 AM   #78
Surprize
Member
 
Surprize's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: in your dreams
Posts: 519
Several books which screen version I have seen before reading. Atonement by Ian McEwan is written very professionaly, but sometimes it's too slow. Chocolat by Joanne Harris is a stream of consciousness, I don't like this fact at all as well as works of Virginia Wulf (we read them in the university, it's a part of curriculum of the History of Literature). The Devil Wears Prada is not bad, but the movie is quite better. The Other Boleyn Girl - too liittle history and too much indecency.
Surprize is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2008, 01:26 AM   #79
Urbanebula
Ice's Wingman
 
Urbanebula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Stoke-On-Trent - UK
Posts: 147
I'm currently reading Wintersmith by Terry Pratchett.

I can really get caught up in a Discworld novel becuase of Pratchett's writing style which incidentally is the same reason a lot of other people can't. I'm not much of a reader but I really enjoy writing my own short stories. I've recently started writing something that will hopefully develop into a novel.

Time will tell I guess.
__________________
--- aut viam inveniam aut faciam ---
Urbanebula is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-11-2008, 05:08 AM   Senior Registered Member #80
Porcelain_Doll
little-miss-smut-for-brains
 
Porcelain_Doll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: River of Painted Birds
Posts: 1,429
The Serpent's Tale, the second in the series of "Mistress in the Art of Death". Not quite as good as the first one, but still worth a read.

Interred with their Bones
, by Jennifer Lee Carrell. Kinda DaVinci Code meets Shakespeare meets The Dante Club. Interesting, and had me guessing who the mysterious Shakespearean-death-imitating killer was till the end.

Nefertiti, by Michelle Moran. Brilliant, delicious reconstruction and writing. Told from the point of view of Mutnodjmet, Nefertiti's younger half-sister and of whom we know very little, shadowed by her famously beautiful and scandalous older sibling

Bastard out of Carolina, by Dorothy Allison. It's a harsh and honest read, and I ended up loving Bone (the main character, though her real name is Ruth Anne) and her family. The best thing about the book, in my opinion, was how the author weaved the family ties. The Boatwrights are so real, they almost jump off the pages...Bone's crazy but adoring uncles were the best...makes you wish for similarly kickass, ex-con, knives-and-guns-loving uncles who would tear towns apart in a heartbeat looking for the jerk who hurt you.
__________________
"There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of either merit or sense." Elizabeth Bennet

musings and ramblings, aka:
my blog





Porcelain_Doll is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 04:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
By appointment to HM Keira Knightley.