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Old 11-06-2007, 08:13 AM   Senior Registered Member #41
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I finaly got around to finishing Davinci Code today. But there was not mutch that wasnt in the movie though.
I lost interest in the book, glad to see I didn't miss out on anything in the last quarter.
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Old 11-06-2007, 11:08 PM   Senior Registered Member #42
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i did not like that book. I prefer James Rollins
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Old 12-06-2007, 01:30 AM   Senior Registered Member #43
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I've re-read for the millionth time "The Phantom of the Opera". I strongly recommend people get the original book, not the new summarised versions that are sheer crap.

it is one of the most brilliant books I've ever read; and along with the "Dante Club", it is one of the few that have made me doubt how much of it was real and how much was fiction. Both authors manage to blur that line between their own imagination and real facts.

But if you're into real facts and not mistery though, I'd recommend "In Cold Blood". The movie was perfectly done, imo, it's terrifying but chillingly true.
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Old 12-06-2007, 02:07 AM   #44
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I've re-read for the millionth time "The Phantom of the Opera". I strongly recommend people get the original book, not the new summarised versions that are sheer crap.

it is one of the most brilliant books I've ever read; and along with the "Dante Club", it is one of the few that have made me doubt how much of it was real and how much was fiction. Both authors manage to blur that line between their own imagination and real facts.

But if you're into real facts and not mistery though, I'd recommend "In Cold Blood". The movie was perfectly done, imo, it's terrifying but chillingly true.
i bought "Dante Club" a few months ago but havent been able to get past the pretty gruesome beginning! im anxious to finish the Count of Monte Cristo (which is excellent!) so i can start it up again and this time finish
its good you say?
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Old 12-06-2007, 07:08 PM   Senior Registered Member #45
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I think the Dante Club was quite good. It gets a bit predictable, but the ending really throws you off. Besides, if you read la Divina Commedia, you'll really appreciate all the references and the thousand meanings behind each phrase
it is quite gruesome, but Dante's Inferno wasn't a walk in the park either

What I found most appealing is that the heroes are actually anti-heroes. They're not cops, just learned old men. They can't go running after a crazy killer, but they still fight with their own weapons.
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Old 03-07-2007, 01:15 PM   #46
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I have no time to read now but I want to recommend the books by Terry Goodkind. I was impressed by the depth and the philosophy of his writings. On the face of it, thet is an ordinary book but when you begin reading... that's amazing.
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Old 06-07-2007, 01:51 AM   Senior Registered Member #47
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Black Order- it was sweet. Sort of a Indiana Jones meets modern times. It had everything Nazis, guns, mutations, adventure.
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Old 06-07-2007, 05:54 AM   KKWiki Contributer Senior Registered Member #48
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I don't know how to read. I want to recommend the books by Dr suess. I was impressed by the depth and the philosophy of his writings. On the face of it, thet is an ordinary book but when you begin reading... that's amazing.
Do tell us more
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Old 06-07-2007, 05:57 AM   #49
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Do tell us more
what a stupid guy you're like a child
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Old 07-07-2007, 07:48 PM   Senior Registered Member #50
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Ran, that's enough. This is a thread for people who can actually read something apart from the instructions on the box of the inflatable doll.

Now, back on topic...I've recently finished "Pompeii", by Robert Harris, and really recommend it for anyone who's interested in Roman architecture. The first chapters may be a little boring, but you understand their extreme importance later on. Brilliant reconstruction, absolutely amazing.

Also read "The Glass Menagerie", by Tennessee Williams.
Laura's character annoyed me a bit, but Jim's was lively and colourful and he's always surprising you.
I very much liked Amanda, she was like a Southern Mrs. Bennet.
And Tom was the usual rebel, but you warm up to him pretty soon after you get to know him a bit. Lovely play.
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Old 18-09-2007, 11:55 AM   #51
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It's funny but I decided to read the fairy-tale "Little Prince" by Antoine de Sent Exupery once more time. The first impression about it some years ago was: "this writer is mad (in bad sense)". But now I can see the great depth and sincerity of this writing.
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Old 30-01-2008, 03:56 PM   Senior Registered Member #52
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yes, yes, I'm bumping my own thread. Sue me.

Here are the books I've read so far:

"Memoirs of Cleopatra", by Margaret George. Absolutely amazing. It's divided into two volumes, and I've only read the first (haven't found the second one yet ), but it's so beautifully written you just can't put it down. Mindblowing reconstruction and descriptions of Alexandria, the Nile and the towns beside it, Rome, every temple you can imagine, the Palace, the Circus, Roman and Egyptian culture and customs (including food, clothes and decoration!) Caesar's home, every character's belongings and personality....it's a work of art.

I finally got around to reading "A Clockwork Orange" and liked it very much, though I still prefer "A Brave New World" if you'd ask me to choose.

Read "Atonement" and loved it; my sister left me a book by Mario Vargas Llosa called "Travesuras de la Niña Mala" ("mischiefs of the Bad Girl"), not his most famous work but the latest, somewhat crude and shocking but still addictive; and I'm reading Jorge Luis Borges' famed "The Aleph". Very confusing style, over and over you keep finding sentences that seem like pure nonsense when parted word by word but actually mean something, or many things. Really strong.

I'm finishing "Pride & Prejudice" (Elles of the world, rejoice ) and yes, I'm loving it. I guess when I first picked it up I was too young to understand it, hence the initial dislike. But so far my favourite characters are Darcy and Mr. Bennet. Wonderful

Also in the works is "I, Richard", by Elizabeth George. They're five tales of murder/suspense, and even if they aren't superb, I like her voice.

A family friend lent me "The Lives of the muses", by Francine Prose, and I can't wait to start it. It focuses on nine women who inspired certain artists, from Gala and Salvador Dalí to Alice Liddel and Lewis Carroll, etc.

And last but not least on my night table is "The uses of enchantment: the meaning and importance of fairy tales", by Bruno Bettelheim. Psychoanalisis of "Little Red Riding Hood", "Hansel and Gretel" and the likes? Yes, please!

Have you read anything good lately? Any suggestions?
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Old 30-01-2008, 05:17 PM   Lifetme Service Award Officer #53
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I've been reading a bit too.

Audrey Niffenegger, The Time Traveler's Wife was pure genius, and the best book I have read in a long time. I like how it's laid out very cleverly, heartbreaking, yet not sentimental. It gets under your skin, somehow. Very strong writing. Forgive the first fifth of the book - getting your mind around the time travel thing takes a little while. It's well worth it, though.

The above book was marketed as "the new Lovely Bones," and since I enjoyed it so much, I thought, what the hell, I'll read some Lovely Bones (Alice Sebold). I love three-for-two sales at Waterstone's.

I took a lot longer to start feeling for the main characters in this one, which seems strange, as one of the first things to happen is the gruesome murder of a 13-year-old girl (don't get angry, this isn't a spoiler, it's part of the premise the book starts out on). This girl goes to heaven, and the concept of heaven is worked out in a very novel, strangely reassuring way. The only link between the books, to me, is this non-linear use of space (and time, to a greater extent in Niffenegger).

It is a charming book, though, but I think Lovely Bones should be retrospectively happy with The Time Traveler's Wife's advertising, not the other way around. Looks like it's going to be made into a movie, and little Saoirse Ronan from Atonement will play Susie. Given that there's some more awesome casting going on (Rachel Weisz as Ocean Eyes, I can totally see that; Susan Sarandon as crazy Grandma Lynn - I have been waiting for that all my life), I'm looking forward to watching that.

Since Lovely Bones, I've started The Book of Dave by Will Self, which has tremendous potential to be both a mirror to society and incredibly funny. I wouldn't know, though, because I was put off by the Clockwork Orange style non-words. I realise that this is part of the point, that we should be so defamiliarised to understand the differences between the world now, in which the book of Dave was presumably written, and the society it is found in, but my God did it give me the shits. I thought that, since I now speak English with reasonable fluency, I could stop reading books in the language by giving myself RSI from flicking back and forth between the glossary and the story. ANNOYING.

So, I've put that to one side for the moment, and picked up The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. This book was recommended to me by a friend in Australia more than a year ago, and I still hadn't picked it up. It's always jumped out at me in bookshops, though, and there were sales on, so here I am, finally reading it. I love the way the story is told, I love the interjection of facts, I love the time it's set in, I love the characters - in short, I really like this book. It doesn't grab you as much as the Time Traveler's Wife does, but I'm only about a third in at this stage, and enjoying it a lot.

Also, yay for Pride & Prejudice. Not quite as big a yay for the Bruno Bettelheim. Psychoanalysis, as it's used in literary criticism, is a pile of shit. Fact. I had to write a paper analysing Rapunzel once, and basically, you twist and turn until everyone looks like a pervert and get a top grade. It is laughable.
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Old 31-01-2008, 06:59 PM   Senior Registered Member #54
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Last Light of The sun- a unigue book that places a historical epic in a very low fantassy setting so that it could be as anachronistic as is wished. The plot is introduced at a brisk pace keeping you reading (even when you should be sleeping). The characters are all interesting and very layered. This is one of my favourite books of all time.
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Old 02-02-2008, 04:19 PM   Attended an OMGWTFKKWBBQ! Officer #55
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Why has it taken me so long to discover this thread? I am currently working at Barnes and Noble, so books = love.

I'm reading Anna Karenina for my Russian class right now. I'm only on page fifty so far, but I really like it.

I just finished Daughter of Fortune by Isabel Allende. A friend let me borrow it and I am glad I took her up on it, because it was a great book! If anyone happens to be at all interested in the California Gold Rush (I know, what a random interest), it is done from a different perspective than most everything else existing on the topic.
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Old 06-02-2008, 09:23 PM   Senior Registered Member #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leonie View Post
I've been reading a bit too.

Audrey Niffenegger, The Time Traveler's Wife was pure genius, and the best book I have read in a long time. I like how it's laid out very cleverly, heartbreaking, yet not sentimental. It gets under your skin, somehow. Very strong writing. Forgive the first fifth of the book - getting your mind around the time travel thing takes a little while. It's well worth it, though.

The above book was marketed as "the new Lovely Bones," and since I enjoyed it so much, I thought, what the hell, I'll read some Lovely Bones (Alice Sebold). I love three-for-two sales at Waterstone's.

I took a lot longer to start feeling for the main characters in this one, which seems strange, as one of the first things to happen is the gruesome murder of a 13-year-old girl (don't get angry, this isn't a spoiler, it's part of the premise the book starts out on). This girl goes to heaven, and the concept of heaven is worked out in a very novel, strangely reassuring way. The only link between the books, to me, is this non-linear use of space (and time, to a greater extent in Niffenegger).

It is a charming book, though, but I think Lovely Bones should be retrospectively happy with The Time Traveler's Wife's advertising, not the other way around. Looks like it's going to be made into a movie, and little Saoirse Ronan from Atonement will play Susie. Given that there's some more awesome casting going on (Rachel Weisz as Ocean Eyes, I can totally see that; Susan Sarandon as crazy Grandma Lynn - I have been waiting for that all my life), I'm looking forward to watching that.

Since Lovely Bones, I've started The Book of Dave by Will Self, which has tremendous potential to be both a mirror to society and incredibly funny. I wouldn't know, though, because I was put off by the Clockwork Orange style non-words. I realise that this is part of the point, that we should be so defamiliarised to understand the differences between the world now, in which the book of Dave was presumably written, and the society it is found in, but my God did it give me the shits. I thought that, since I now speak English with reasonable fluency, I could stop reading books in the language by giving myself RSI from flicking back and forth between the glossary and the story. ANNOYING.

So, I've put that to one side for the moment, and picked up The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. This book was recommended to me by a friend in Australia more than a year ago, and I still hadn't picked it up. It's always jumped out at me in bookshops, though, and there were sales on, so here I am, finally reading it. I love the way the story is told, I love the interjection of facts, I love the time it's set in, I love the characters - in short, I really like this book. It doesn't grab you as much as the Time Traveler's Wife does, but I'm only about a third in at this stage, and enjoying it a lot.

Also, yay for Pride & Prejudice. Not quite as big a yay for the Bruno Bettelheim. Psychoanalysis, as it's used in literary criticism, is a pile of shit. Fact. I had to write a paper analysing Rapunzel once, and basically, you twist and turn until everyone looks like a pervert and get a top grade. It is laughable.
I'm totally platonically in love with you. Which I think was what you said when I started this thread, so I guess I'm returning the love. heh

The Book Thief is one of my all-time favourites, I'm so glad you're enjoying it!!

Are you serious about The Lovely Bones being made into a movie?! I don't know if I want to see that book come to life, the writing is so...particular (sheesh, how specific of me).
Susan Sarandon would make a fantastic Grandma Lynn..I wonder who they'll choose to play Mr. Harvey.
I'm a bit confused with the "Ocean Eyes", who was that? Lindsey?

And for Kelsey, if you liked Daughter of Fortune, you should also get Portrait in Sepia. It continues the story, and it's written in the same style and times.
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Old 15-03-2008, 07:45 AM   #57
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Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell. At the beginning, it was rather boring. Too much history, as for me. Of course, I don't mind history and I'm quite interested in it but sometimes I began to think about nothing, when reading. Later, I used to manner of writing and found the book not bad. Finally, I like it.
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. I was a bit afraid to read this book and suspicious of it. Now for me it seems to be very sunny and inspirational.
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Old 06-06-2008, 12:43 PM   #58
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The Chronicles of Amber by Roger Joseph Zelazny Oh god. I can't believe that I've read these ten novel. At the beginning it was interesting but then it was so difficult. I was tired of this fantasy Anyway, I've read it.
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen At first glance, nothing special but I couldn't stop reading. Without doubt J. Austen is the best British writer.
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Old 08-06-2008, 04:06 PM   #59
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Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck

Great book - Only took me a couple of days to read but very moving. Some really lovable characters too. Don't expect a happy ending. (You can tell I'm not a professional book-reviewer )
Moving on to Grapes of Wrath now - another Steinbeck book.
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Old 09-06-2008, 07:11 PM   Attended an OMGWTFKKWBBQ! Officer #60
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and I'm reading Jorge Luis Borges' famed "The Aleph". Very confusing style, over and over you keep finding sentences that seem like pure nonsense when parted word by word but actually mean something, or many things. Really strong.
Borges is amazing...I read a couple of his short stories in a literature class I was taking (I think from the Aleph) and really liked them. I was glad to have read them in an atmosphere where we were able to discuss because like you said, there are so many meanings to his work.

I just got into the author Christopher Buckley. For those amused by american politics, his books are simply hilarious. The first one I read was "Boomsday", which presents an hilarious solution to the Social Security crisis. Now I know what books I'm taking on my trip with me.
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