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Porcelain_Doll
03-06-2007, 08:09 PM
I have no patience to search the forums and see if this has already been done in the past.
If it has, I don't care, for it hasn't been done by me so it's different than the other one.

Anyway, as many of you don't know, I'm a big reader. Ok, I'm a certified bookworm. And so I thought it would be nice to have a readers' thread, instead of all the "do you know what perfume Keira wears" threads.
Words never killed anyone. Unless you're Socrates, or...wait, nevermind that.

So, it would be rather nice if people posted their favourite reading material, their latest purchases in that area, discussed books and authors and recommended them for others to read.
For example, at the moment I'm reading "The Mill on the floss", by George Eliot. I'm really liking her voice, and Maggie has won me over from the start. People have told me I should also purchase "Silas Marner" by her, and "Middlemarch" too.

I bought "Timbuktu" by Paul Auster but haven't started it yet, I've heard many different opinions on him and can't wait to make up my own.

So there you go. Discuss. And don't you dare ruin this with "I don't read" or "all I read are shampoo bottles" 'cause I'll voodoo you. If you don't read, why on earth are you viewing this thread?

Bullets19
03-06-2007, 10:09 PM
Well I just got finished reading a good book called flyboys though it can be slow at times and I finaly just got ahold of a copy of Davinci Code even though I already saw the movie, the book came out along time ago but I would still like to get caught up on some parts that did not seem to make sense in the movie.

Leonie
03-06-2007, 10:14 PM
PeeDee, on a completely platonic level, I love you.

I bought "Timbuktu" by Paul Auster but haven't started it yet, I've heard many different opinions on him and can't wait to make up my own.

I am supposed to read the New York Trilogy by Paul Auster, but I have only read the opening paragraph so far (it was part of an exam). It sounds incredibly interesting, though, and the teacher recommending it is positively awesome, so I'll have to try to get my hands on it.

I am currently reading Michael Chabon's The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, recommended by the wonderful Margarita. Hardly any of you have had the pleasure of knowing this most awesome KKW member, but she rocks, trust me. And so does the book, so far. I'll post a more comprehensive review once I've finished it.

In the quick read section, I am reading Nora Roberts' Heaven and Earth, because it's about witches and beautifully cheesy.

Bullets19, you read, and therefore you know the importance of punctation. Could you try using a fecking full stop occasionally? Thank you. :)

Bullets19
03-06-2007, 10:18 PM
PeeDee, on a completely platonic level, I love you.



I am supposed to read the New York Trilogy by Paul Auster, but I have only read the opening paragraph so far (it was part of an exam). It sounds incredibly interesting, though, and the teacher recommending it is positively awesome, so I'll have to try to get my hands on it.

I am currently reading Michael Chabon's The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, recommended by the wonderful Margarita. Hardly any of you have had the pleasure of knowing this most awesome KKW member, but she rocks, trust me. And so does the book, so far. I'll post a more comprehensive review once I've finished it.

In the quick read section, I am reading Nora Roberts' Heaven and Earth, because it's about witches and beautifully cheesy.

Bullets19, you read, and therefore you know the importance of punctation. Could you try using a fecking full stop occasionally? Thank you. :)
Yeah I know its just a bad habit.

Leonie
03-06-2007, 10:28 PM
Yeah I know its just a bad habit.

I greatly encourage you to break it.

I should add, I'm also planning to finally read all my Jane Austen books this summer. Until now, I have read Pride & Prejudice, Northanger Abbey and Sense & Sensibility. I've also read substantial chunks of Persuasion and Mansfield Park. I couldn't finish the former because it was part of a course and I got too busy. I'm having a lot of trouble getting into Mansfield Park because I just don't care for the main character. Every time I get into it, something comes up and I don't finish it. I adore Jane Austen though, so I'm going to try my best to finish those two, and add Emma and Lady Susan/The Watsons/Sanditon to the list.

Porcelain_Doll
04-06-2007, 12:38 AM
PeeDee, on a completely platonic level, I love you.

That's one of the biggest compliments since someone called me "the Devil itself".

I'm (not) shocked that only two people at kkw read. So prove me wrong, if you wish. :p

By the way, I also bought "Learning To Live" by Luc Ferry. No, it's not a help book, it's philosophy. And it rocks.
here's the link, if anyone's interested: click (http://www.amazon.com/Aprender-Vivir-Learning-Live-Ferry/dp/9707708573/ref=sr_1_19/002-5339380-3306444?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1180917293&sr=1-19)

Bullets19
04-06-2007, 01:54 AM
It sounds like a interesting book on philosophy. Perhaps I will read it some day.

michael22
04-06-2007, 05:10 AM
The books I have recently started or finished

A demon haunted world by Carl Sagan.
great a must read for everyone
Dune-Frank Herbert= READ!
Bourne Identity, twas good
Rob Roy- sir Walter Scott
damn he was a good writer, and damn what a story
War and Peace- finnished in two days woot!!
Crime and Punishment- great exploration of guilt

kingdumbass
04-06-2007, 05:47 AM
I'm on vacation at the moment, so I'm reading quite a bit....
Just finished:
Tales of the South Pacific, and
Mutiny on the Bounty.

Currently reading A Confederacy of Dunces.

Good. All of them.

Pygmalion
04-06-2007, 08:52 AM
Cold Comfort Farm

I thought it was ok, I wish Flora'd come and make MY life awesome like she does for the country bumpkins in the book.

Surprize
04-06-2007, 09:21 AM
PeeDee, thank you for this thread! You know, I like reading and writing too. I began to read "Hobbit". I have read it and the next trilogy "The Lord of The Rings" when I was 10. Now I want to remember it.

x.keirafan.x
04-06-2007, 04:23 PM
I have read these last few weeks:
Jane Austins: Pride and Prejudice, Northanger Abby and Mansfield park and Emma.
and two doctor who books. But my doctor who books i read in one day so they dont really count to me because they had big wrigting.
Ilove books me and my mom are decorating my room now and my mom found all my old books under my bed all together i have 58 books!

duckula
04-06-2007, 04:29 PM
Just finished:

Mindhunter by John Douglas

This is a great but pretty disturbing book about criminal profiling and serial killers by a former FBI profiler (think Silence of the Lambs). Totally gripping.

Sea Harrier Over The Falklands by Cmdr. 'Sharkey' Ward:

Another first hand account, this time of the air war during the Falklands conflict by a Sea Harrier Squadron Commander. Fascinating study of modern air warfare and simply a great tale. You just can't make this shit up.

In progress:

I'm not one for reading just one book at a time so here are the ones I have on the go currently.

Hamlet by William Shakespeare

On the few occasions I have been forced to read Shakespeare or endure sitting through one of the plays I have been bored and uninterested and so I have generally just avoided his work. My interest was however, awakened following the viewing of a tv show about a Canadian theatre festival. Now on the surface this sounds like a recipe for rampant snobbery and boredom, it is actually fucking brilliant. It is called Slings & Arrows and in my not at all humble opinion it is one of the finest television shows ever created (watch it bitches).

So I thought I should give old WS another go and so I've started reading Hamlet. Seems pretty good so far.

Northanger Abbey by Jane Austin:

Haven't got very far but what I've read I've enjoyed. I loved Pride & Prejudice so I reckon I will enjoy this.

The Utility of Force by Rupert Smith:

Rupert Smith is a retired British General and this is basically his thoughts on the roots and realities of modern warfare. I would say it is the most important work on warfare since that of John Boyd (look him up) and before him Von Clausewitz (if you have to look him up then shame on you). Required reading for anyone interested in current affairs.

Next up:

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay by Michael Chabon:

Finally taking the aforementioned advice of Mags (where are you?)

Leonie
04-06-2007, 06:38 PM
In progress:

I'm not one for reading just one book at a time so here are the ones I have on the go currently.

Hamlet by William Shakespeare

On the few occasions I have been forced to read Shakespeare or endure sitting through one of the plays I have been bored and uninterested and so I have generally just avoided his work. My interest was however, awakened following the viewing of a tv show about a Canadian theatre festival. Now on the surface this sounds like a recipe for rampant snobbery and boredom, it is actually fucking brilliant. It is called Slings & Arrows and in my not at all humble opinion it is one of the finest television shows ever created (watch it bitches).

So I thought I should give old WS another go and so I've started reading Hamlet. Seems pretty good so far.

Northanger Abbey by Jane Austin:

Haven't got very far but what I've read I've enjoyed. I loved Pride & Prejudice so I reckon I will enjoy this.


Next up:

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay by Michael Chabon:

Finally taking the aforementioned advice of Mags (where are you?)

You must be in my head or something.

Anyway, I was posting to say that I have the same thing with Shakespeare. I have majored (more or less) in literature, among other random stuff, and I'd never read anything more than a few pages of Shakespeare. I felt kind of bad, so when I came across a giant collection of all his works for just six shiny euros (kindly donated by Liam), I decided to give it a go. I'm reading the Merchant of Venice currently, and I'm enjoying it a lot.

Also, Northanger Abbey is quite possibly my favourite Jane Austen novel so far. The main character has everything Elizabeth Bennett I love, and then some more that's Catherine Morland's own. Loved it. I read it after failing to get into Mansfield Park for the umpteenth time - and I finished it quick smart.

hasselbrad
04-06-2007, 06:44 PM
You must be in my head or something.

Anyway, I was posting to say that I have the same thing with Shakespeare. I have majored (more or less) in literature, among other random stuff, and I'd never read anything more than a few pages of Shakespeare. I felt kind of bad, so when I came across a giant collection of all his works for just six shiny euros (kindly donated by Liam), I decided to give it a go. I'm reading the Merchant of Venice currently, and I'm enjoying it a lot.

Also, Northanger Abbey is quite possibly my favourite Jane Austen novel so far. The main character has everything Elizabeth Bennett I love, and then some more that's Catherine Morland's own. Loved it. I read it after failing to get into Mansfield Park for the umpteenth time - and I finished it quick smart.

He's stalking you telepathically.
I started reading Pride and Prejudice, but stopped when I got busy with this screenplay. Now, I'm reading a screenwriting book.

Porcelain_Doll
04-06-2007, 06:47 PM
I found this amazing old copy of "Alice in Wonderland" today...it was totally fate, just yesterday night my sis and I were discussing philosophy, the tales of the cavern and the rabbit and all, and I mentioned the "follow the white rabbit" that Neo gets in The Matrix, and she mentioned the Bunny that was always in a hurry in Carrol's book.

Talk about coincidences...that would make the amount of books I'm reading at the time about 4, not including the ones for literature at school.

DanMan
04-06-2007, 07:27 PM
Well, better make that three KKW members that read constantly!
I recently read "The Davinci Code" and recommend it to everyone.
I also read Atonement and hated it! The movie does seem to have
some changes that allow Keira's Character quite a bit more face time it
appears than if they went strictly by the novel.
I read lots of books on architecture even though I am no longer
pursuing a degree in that field.

Leonie
04-06-2007, 07:33 PM
Well, better make that three KKW members that read constantly!
I recently read "The Davinci Code" and recommend it to everyone.
I also read Atonement and hated it! The movie does seem to have
some changes that allow Keira's Character quite a bit more face time it
appears than if they went strictly by the novel.
I read lots of books on architecture even though I am no longer
pursuing a degree in that field.

You hated Atonement? I read it after reading Ian McEwan's Saturday, and I loved both novels. Also started his novel The Cement Garden, but that one was way too weird for me on so many levels.

Atonement really is Briony's story, and Cecilia is a minor character. However, Briony's actions greatly influence Cecilia's life. I think the director originally wanted her to play one of the Brionies, even.

Anyway, I thought it was incredibly well-written. Even though the story was predictable enough after a certain point, his characters kept the story from becoming bland.

michael22
05-06-2007, 01:38 AM
The Three Musketeers- wow what assholes these guys were. No really thy were abnoxious servant beating pigs. I want to be one now

Surprize
05-06-2007, 05:00 AM
I see that rather many people say that they have read Pride and Ptejudice. I read it last week but I think the film was more interesting.

x.keirafan.x
05-06-2007, 07:06 AM
More to add to the list i have now read:
Pirates of the Caribbean Curse of the Black Pearl
Pirates of the Caribbean dead mans chest
Pirates of the Caribbean At Worlds End

Urbanebula
05-06-2007, 08:07 AM
The only 4 books I have ever finished in my free time in chronological order:-

-The Prize Winner of Defiance, Ohio. (moving true story)
-Bored of the Rings (awesome parody)
-Terry Pratchett's Discworld: The Truth
-Terry Pratchett's Discworld: Thud

Currently working my way through:-

-Terry Pratchett's Discworld: Guards! Guards!

AureaMediocritas
05-06-2007, 06:10 PM
The Byzantium trilogy by John Julius Norwich.
A shame Byzantium has been contempted in western spheres since Edward Gibbon.

Pygmalion
06-06-2007, 01:29 AM
More to add to the list i have now read:
Pirates of the Caribbean Curse of the Black Pearl
Pirates of the Caribbean dead mans chest
Pirates of the Caribbean At Worlds End


There are books now?! Jeez.

Captain Corelli's Mandolin

Awesome but I'm going to join every other woman who's read this book and say: I didn't like the last quarter. I don't care how much it reflected what would have happened at the time, I like happy endings damnit!

Bullets19
06-06-2007, 04:30 AM
Today I finaly finished the book Custer And Crazy Horse. It was writen by Stephen Ambrose and the book was about the wild west and both charecters take on similar events. The book was good but a little boering at times.

x.keirafan.x
06-06-2007, 07:00 AM
Some people think reading is for so call them geeks. But is not. I told my friend the other day that i love to read that it was a secret cant tell no one because im already getting bullied.

And she didn't laugh she said i understand i used to have a pashion for reading. I said" What happend" she just simply said
"Bullieing put me off reading."

Why do people bully people who like to read and take the mick out of them. What have they got against reading?:dontknowa :banghead: :read:

shiva
06-06-2007, 07:14 AM
They dont have the vocabulary to verbally insult anyone so they just resort to bulleying :)
I wouldnt worry about it. In five or ten years you'll be employing them.
Read on! :)
Anyways i just finished a book called Year of Wonders. its about a village that quarantines itself during the Plague. Its written by a british author and is very good.
Gail Tsukiyama has quite a number of novels i recommend as well, particularly The Samurai's Garden. Haven't read it in ages and I'm pretty sure it's a fairly easy read, but still a beautiful story.

(http://www.amazon.com/Samurais-Garden-Novel-Gail-Tsukiyama/dp/0312144075)

Ranman
06-06-2007, 07:51 AM
Real men don't read, We just look at the pictures

Digital_Ice
06-06-2007, 10:04 AM
meh, in that case i'd rather be educated brit than a dumbass "real" american :p

Ranman
06-06-2007, 10:50 AM
Oh yeah......

can't think of a good comeback

Atvar
06-06-2007, 01:27 PM
Im currently trying to get through

Terry Pratchett - Mort
The Pythons Autobiography

Porcelain_Doll
06-06-2007, 05:24 PM
Real men don't read, We just look at the pictures

read my first post, Ran. You're on the voodoo list.

Shiva's right. People make fun of me all the time for bringing huge books and reading them during class breaks.
But then they try to read the title and fail miserably. Who gives a shit? I've always been a bookworm and classmates have made me cry when I was a kid for it.

Now I laugh (ok, sneer) when they make fun of my reading. It only shows how ignorant they are....and that they are proud of being so.

michael22
07-06-2007, 05:11 AM
The Ulster Cycle- wow a much better time than the illiad.
Full of heroic imagery and daring doo ( yes I found a way to use that in a sentance).

The books by winston churhill regarding WWII not bad but a little preachy.
Get tough a ww2 british close combat training manual
A dumbasses guide to tea
A idiots guide to wine
My local brewhouses import beer menu

hasselbrad
07-06-2007, 12:40 PM
read my first post, Ran. You're on the voodoo list.

In all fairness, he does read the line of the "story" before he colors the picture.

Porcelain_Doll
07-06-2007, 05:40 PM
Lmao!

Being a dad does have its benefits, you get to mock in an entire new way. :p

Pygmalion
08-06-2007, 01:55 AM
The Life Of Pi
I thought it would be about Maths when my dad gave it to me, praise Jesus its not.

Leonie
08-06-2007, 09:29 AM
The Life Of Pi
I thought it would be about Maths when my dad gave it to me, praise Jesus its not.
Awww, I loved that book. In high school, my English teacher gave it to me to read as a test audience. She loved the book, and if I liked it too, it would go on the reading list.

Years later, my sister read the Life of Pi for her English reading list at that school :icon_bigg

Hazzle
08-06-2007, 08:19 PM
Not nearly as high-brow as the rest of you lot, but I enjoy a bit of light reading now and then, so at the moment I'm reading And Another Thing;The World According to Clarkson by Jeremy Clarkson. Don't always agree with his views on things (particularly gay rights to marry or adopt) but at least he expresses them freely, without concern of what people may think of him and I always respect that in people. Especially if what they're saying is cutting against the grain. Plus he always tends to have his say in an especially funny manner. Good book so far.

duckula
11-06-2007, 02:15 AM
I started reading the Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay yesterday, read 8 pages and went to bed. On waking up about lunch time I realised that I fancied reading abit more. So I read the rest of it. It was rather good.

Bullets19
11-06-2007, 04:33 AM
I finaly got around to finishing Davinci Code today. But there was not mutch that wasnt in the movie though.

Pygmalion
11-06-2007, 08:13 AM
I finaly got around to finishing Davinci Code today. But there was not mutch that wasnt in the movie though.

I lost interest in the book, glad to see I didn't miss out on anything in the last quarter.

michael22
11-06-2007, 11:08 PM
i did not like that book. I prefer James Rollins

Porcelain_Doll
12-06-2007, 01:30 AM
I've re-read for the millionth time "The Phantom of the Opera". I strongly recommend people get the original book, not the new summarised versions that are sheer crap.

it is one of the most brilliant books I've ever read; and along with the "Dante Club", it is one of the few that have made me doubt how much of it was real and how much was fiction. Both authors manage to blur that line between their own imagination and real facts.

But if you're into real facts and not mistery though, I'd recommend "In Cold Blood". The movie was perfectly done, imo, it's terrifying but chillingly true.

shiva
12-06-2007, 02:07 AM
I've re-read for the millionth time "The Phantom of the Opera". I strongly recommend people get the original book, not the new summarised versions that are sheer crap.

it is one of the most brilliant books I've ever read; and along with the "Dante Club", it is one of the few that have made me doubt how much of it was real and how much was fiction. Both authors manage to blur that line between their own imagination and real facts.

But if you're into real facts and not mistery though, I'd recommend "In Cold Blood". The movie was perfectly done, imo, it's terrifying but chillingly true.

i bought "Dante Club" a few months ago but havent been able to get past the pretty gruesome beginning! im anxious to finish the Count of Monte Cristo (which is excellent!) so i can start it up again and this time finish :)
its good you say?

Porcelain_Doll
12-06-2007, 07:08 PM
I think the Dante Club was quite good. It gets a bit predictable, but the ending really throws you off. Besides, if you read la Divina Commedia, you'll really appreciate all the references and the thousand meanings behind each phrase :)
it is quite gruesome, but Dante's Inferno wasn't a walk in the park either :p

What I found most appealing is that the heroes are actually anti-heroes. They're not cops, just learned old men. They can't go running after a crazy killer, but they still fight with their own weapons.

Surprize
03-07-2007, 01:15 PM
I have no time to read now but I want to recommend the books by Terry Goodkind. I was impressed by the depth and the philosophy of his writings. On the face of it, thet is an ordinary book but when you begin reading... that's amazing.

michael22
06-07-2007, 01:51 AM
Black Order- it was sweet. Sort of a Indiana Jones meets modern times. It had everything Nazis, guns, mutations, adventure.

Ranman
06-07-2007, 05:54 AM
I don't know how to read. I want to recommend the books by Dr suess. I was impressed by the depth and the philosophy of his writings. On the face of it, thet is an ordinary book but when you begin reading... that's amazing.

Do tell us more:icon_lol:

Surprize
06-07-2007, 05:57 AM
Do tell us more:icon_lol:
what a stupid guy:dontknowa you're like a child

Porcelain_Doll
07-07-2007, 07:48 PM
Ran, that's enough. This is a thread for people who can actually read something apart from the instructions on the box of the inflatable doll.

Now, back on topic...I've recently finished "Pompeii", by Robert Harris, and really recommend it for anyone who's interested in Roman architecture. The first chapters may be a little boring, but you understand their extreme importance later on. Brilliant reconstruction, absolutely amazing.

Also read "The Glass Menagerie", by Tennessee Williams.
Laura's character annoyed me a bit, but Jim's was lively and colourful and he's always surprising you.
I very much liked Amanda, she was like a Southern Mrs. Bennet.
And Tom was the usual rebel, but you warm up to him pretty soon after you get to know him a bit. Lovely play.

Surprize
18-09-2007, 11:55 AM
It's funny but I decided to read the fairy-tale "Little Prince" by Antoine de Sent Exupery once more time. The first impression about it some years ago was: "this writer is mad (in bad sense)". But now I can see the great depth and sincerity of this writing.

Porcelain_Doll
30-01-2008, 03:56 PM
yes, yes, I'm bumping my own thread. Sue me.

Here are the books I've read so far:

"Memoirs of Cleopatra", by Margaret George. Absolutely amazing. It's divided into two volumes, and I've only read the first (haven't found the second one yet :(), but it's so beautifully written you just can't put it down. Mindblowing reconstruction and descriptions of Alexandria, the Nile and the towns beside it, Rome, every temple you can imagine, the Palace, the Circus, Roman and Egyptian culture and customs (including food, clothes and decoration!) Caesar's home, every character's belongings and personality....it's a work of art.

I finally got around to reading "A Clockwork Orange" and liked it very much, though I still prefer "A Brave New World" if you'd ask me to choose.

Read "Atonement" and loved it; my sister left me a book by Mario Vargas Llosa called "Travesuras de la Niña Mala" ("mischiefs of the Bad Girl"), not his most famous work but the latest, somewhat crude and shocking but still addictive; and I'm reading Jorge Luis Borges' famed "The Aleph". Very confusing style, over and over you keep finding sentences that seem like pure nonsense when parted word by word but actually mean something, or many things. Really strong.

I'm finishing "Pride & Prejudice" (Elles of the world, rejoice :p) and yes, I'm loving it. I guess when I first picked it up I was too young to understand it, hence the initial dislike. But so far my favourite characters are Darcy and Mr. Bennet. Wonderful :D

Also in the works is "I, Richard", by Elizabeth George. They're five tales of murder/suspense, and even if they aren't superb, I like her voice.

A family friend lent me "The Lives of the muses", by Francine Prose, and I can't wait to start it. It focuses on nine women who inspired certain artists, from Gala and Salvador Dalí to Alice Liddel and Lewis Carroll, etc.

And last but not least on my night table is "The uses of enchantment: the meaning and importance of fairy tales", by Bruno Bettelheim. Psychoanalisis of "Little Red Riding Hood", "Hansel and Gretel" and the likes? Yes, please! :D

Have you read anything good lately? Any suggestions?

Leonie
30-01-2008, 05:17 PM
I've been reading a bit too.

Audrey Niffenegger, The Time Traveler's Wife was pure genius, and the best book I have read in a long time. I like how it's laid out very cleverly, heartbreaking, yet not sentimental. It gets under your skin, somehow. Very strong writing. Forgive the first fifth of the book - getting your mind around the time travel thing takes a little while. It's well worth it, though.

The above book was marketed as "the new Lovely Bones," and since I enjoyed it so much, I thought, what the hell, I'll read some Lovely Bones (Alice Sebold). I love three-for-two sales at Waterstone's.

I took a lot longer to start feeling for the main characters in this one, which seems strange, as one of the first things to happen is the gruesome murder of a 13-year-old girl (don't get angry, this isn't a spoiler, it's part of the premise the book starts out on). This girl goes to heaven, and the concept of heaven is worked out in a very novel, strangely reassuring way. The only link between the books, to me, is this non-linear use of space (and time, to a greater extent in Niffenegger).

It is a charming book, though, but I think Lovely Bones should be retrospectively happy with The Time Traveler's Wife's advertising, not the other way around. Looks like it's going to be made into a movie, and little Saoirse Ronan from Atonement will play Susie. Given that there's some more awesome casting going on (Rachel Weisz as Ocean Eyes, I can totally see that; Susan Sarandon as crazy Grandma Lynn - I have been waiting for that all my life), I'm looking forward to watching that.

Since Lovely Bones, I've started The Book of Dave by Will Self, which has tremendous potential to be both a mirror to society and incredibly funny. I wouldn't know, though, because I was put off by the Clockwork Orange style non-words. I realise that this is part of the point, that we should be so defamiliarised to understand the differences between the world now, in which the book of Dave was presumably written, and the society it is found in, but my God did it give me the shits. I thought that, since I now speak English with reasonable fluency, I could stop reading books in the language by giving myself RSI from flicking back and forth between the glossary and the story. ANNOYING.

So, I've put that to one side for the moment, and picked up The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. This book was recommended to me by a friend in Australia more than a year ago, and I still hadn't picked it up. It's always jumped out at me in bookshops, though, and there were sales on, so here I am, finally reading it. I love the way the story is told, I love the interjection of facts, I love the time it's set in, I love the characters - in short, I really like this book. It doesn't grab you as much as the Time Traveler's Wife does, but I'm only about a third in at this stage, and enjoying it a lot.

Also, yay for Pride & Prejudice. Not quite as big a yay for the Bruno Bettelheim. Psychoanalysis, as it's used in literary criticism, is a pile of shit. Fact. I had to write a paper analysing Rapunzel once, and basically, you twist and turn until everyone looks like a pervert and get a top grade. It is laughable.

michael22
31-01-2008, 06:59 PM
Last Light of The sun- a unigue book that places a historical epic in a very low fantassy setting so that it could be as anachronistic as is wished. The plot is introduced at a brisk pace keeping you reading (even when you should be sleeping). The characters are all interesting and very layered. This is one of my favourite books of all time.

Kelsey
02-02-2008, 04:19 PM
Why has it taken me so long to discover this thread? I am currently working at Barnes and Noble, so books = love.

I'm reading Anna Karenina for my Russian class right now. I'm only on page fifty so far, but I really like it.

I just finished Daughter of Fortune by Isabel Allende. A friend let me borrow it and I am glad I took her up on it, because it was a great book! If anyone happens to be at all interested in the California Gold Rush (I know, what a random interest), it is done from a different perspective than most everything else existing on the topic.

Porcelain_Doll
06-02-2008, 09:23 PM
I've been reading a bit too.

Audrey Niffenegger, The Time Traveler's Wife was pure genius, and the best book I have read in a long time. I like how it's laid out very cleverly, heartbreaking, yet not sentimental. It gets under your skin, somehow. Very strong writing. Forgive the first fifth of the book - getting your mind around the time travel thing takes a little while. It's well worth it, though.

The above book was marketed as "the new Lovely Bones," and since I enjoyed it so much, I thought, what the hell, I'll read some Lovely Bones (Alice Sebold). I love three-for-two sales at Waterstone's.

I took a lot longer to start feeling for the main characters in this one, which seems strange, as one of the first things to happen is the gruesome murder of a 13-year-old girl (don't get angry, this isn't a spoiler, it's part of the premise the book starts out on). This girl goes to heaven, and the concept of heaven is worked out in a very novel, strangely reassuring way. The only link between the books, to me, is this non-linear use of space (and time, to a greater extent in Niffenegger).

It is a charming book, though, but I think Lovely Bones should be retrospectively happy with The Time Traveler's Wife's advertising, not the other way around. Looks like it's going to be made into a movie, and little Saoirse Ronan from Atonement will play Susie. Given that there's some more awesome casting going on (Rachel Weisz as Ocean Eyes, I can totally see that; Susan Sarandon as crazy Grandma Lynn - I have been waiting for that all my life), I'm looking forward to watching that.

Since Lovely Bones, I've started The Book of Dave by Will Self, which has tremendous potential to be both a mirror to society and incredibly funny. I wouldn't know, though, because I was put off by the Clockwork Orange style non-words. I realise that this is part of the point, that we should be so defamiliarised to understand the differences between the world now, in which the book of Dave was presumably written, and the society it is found in, but my God did it give me the shits. I thought that, since I now speak English with reasonable fluency, I could stop reading books in the language by giving myself RSI from flicking back and forth between the glossary and the story. ANNOYING.

So, I've put that to one side for the moment, and picked up The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. This book was recommended to me by a friend in Australia more than a year ago, and I still hadn't picked it up. It's always jumped out at me in bookshops, though, and there were sales on, so here I am, finally reading it. I love the way the story is told, I love the interjection of facts, I love the time it's set in, I love the characters - in short, I really like this book. It doesn't grab you as much as the Time Traveler's Wife does, but I'm only about a third in at this stage, and enjoying it a lot.

Also, yay for Pride & Prejudice. Not quite as big a yay for the Bruno Bettelheim. Psychoanalysis, as it's used in literary criticism, is a pile of shit. Fact. I had to write a paper analysing Rapunzel once, and basically, you twist and turn until everyone looks like a pervert and get a top grade. It is laughable.

I'm totally platonically in love with you. Which I think was what you said when I started this thread, so I guess I'm returning the love. heh

The Book Thief is one of my all-time favourites, I'm so glad you're enjoying it!!

Are you serious about The Lovely Bones being made into a movie?! I don't know if I want to see that book come to life, the writing is so...particular (sheesh, how specific of me).
Susan Sarandon would make a fantastic Grandma Lynn..I wonder who they'll choose to play Mr. Harvey.
I'm a bit confused with the "Ocean Eyes", who was that? Lindsey?

And for Kelsey, if you liked Daughter of Fortune, you should also get Portrait in Sepia. It continues the story, and it's written in the same style and times.

Surprize
15-03-2008, 07:45 AM
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell. At the beginning, it was rather boring. Too much history, as for me. Of course, I don't mind history and I'm quite interested in it but sometimes I began to think about nothing, when reading. Later, I used to manner of writing and found the book not bad. Finally, I like it.
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. I was a bit afraid to read this book and suspicious of it. Now for me it seems to be very sunny and inspirational.

Surprize
06-06-2008, 12:43 PM
The Chronicles of Amber by Roger Joseph Zelazny Oh god. I can't believe that I've read these ten novel. At the beginning it was interesting but then it was so difficult. I was tired of this fantasy $) Anyway, I've read it.
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen At first glance, nothing special but I couldn't stop reading. Without doubt J. Austen is the best British writer.

Joly
08-06-2008, 04:06 PM
Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck

Great book - Only took me a couple of days to read but very moving. Some really lovable characters too. Don't expect a happy ending. (You can tell I'm not a professional book-reviewer ;))
Moving on to Grapes of Wrath now - another Steinbeck book.

Kelsey
09-06-2008, 07:11 PM
and I'm reading Jorge Luis Borges' famed "The Aleph". Very confusing style, over and over you keep finding sentences that seem like pure nonsense when parted word by word but actually mean something, or many things. Really strong.

Borges is amazing...I read a couple of his short stories in a literature class I was taking (I think from the Aleph) and really liked them. I was glad to have read them in an atmosphere where we were able to discuss because like you said, there are so many meanings to his work.

I just got into the author Christopher Buckley. For those amused by american politics, his books are simply hilarious. The first one I read was "Boomsday", which presents an hilarious solution to the Social Security crisis. Now I know what books I'm taking on my trip with me.

michael22
12-06-2008, 04:41 AM
I just picked up two archeology text books for a really good price, two were just reference books that were on sale and my friend just dropped out of it to be an accoutant ( I wonder why I hang out with him :p) so he gave me his old ones for twenty dollars. They are quite an interesting read.

I also just got the zombie survival guide, funny but with some interesting socil commentary.

Ranman
12-06-2008, 10:25 PM
I just picked up two archeology text books for a really good price,.

I picked up a archeology book too. Indiana Jones and his boner of doom. A lot of great pics.

Elizabethine
13-06-2008, 07:30 PM
I see that rather many people say that they have read Pride and Ptejudice. I read it last week but I think the film was more interesting.
I think it is hard to say if the book or the film is better....but I think books are always better....you can imagine the characters...like they lookalike...how they are talking, with how accent....and everything...in film..you see like characters lookalike...how they are talking........:icon_! and i feel injured :D that SOMEONE thinks that we don´t read.....I´ve just started to read historc books (especially about 2.ww) but I adore novels like Jane Eyre (Emma and P&P of course) and now I started to read Shakespeare´s playes :)

eelliiinn
17-06-2008, 06:47 PM
Ive just finished reading "The it girl" by Cecily von Ziegesar, it's a follow-up to the Gossip Girl series. I really like this book , but its a bit confusing in the beginning when you dont know the characters and suddenly youre reading about what happens in their lifes, and i was like: "hey, slow down, who is this guy?" Anyway it's good and if you like the gossip girl books you have to read this one!

Surprize
29-06-2008, 11:45 AM
I'm reading a fantasy book of a Russian writer, nothing special, that's why I want to read it to the end faster.
I also read The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes in English to develop my knowlege and make one more step to master the language. I have already read 20 small pages and it was difficult. More than 200 new words, confusing $)
Btw, I don't know why but in my view S. Holmes is very similar to Ice, lol

Leonie
30-06-2008, 09:38 PM
Recently read:

Under the Tuscan Sun, Frances Mayes. Loved it. The narrative isn't particularly thrilling, but it's a nice book to give you a flavour of Italy. Reading it whilst in Italy may have helped. My parents both thought it too boring to finish, so the jury is still out on whether it is actually good.

The Secret of Lost Things, Sheridan Hay. Loved reading it, it's a book drenched in the love of books. I was a little disappointed by the ending though, it seemed rather abrupt and anticlimactic. It's good 7/8ths of the way, the last bit is forgettable. Decently written, though.

On Chesil Beach, Ian McEwan. I'm a bit divided as far as this one goes. So much history had to be worked into the present story of two newlyweds that I got a little bored at times. I didn't really care for the main characters, perhaps because McEwan is always frighteningly accurate in his observations on human behaviour, making for slightly uncomfortable reading. The last chapter is brilliant, and I like the way the story was set up, but the execution was a bit yawn-worthy at times. That said, I'm just happy it wasn't freakish like the Cement Garden, which was off-putting and plain gross.

I'm 4/5ths of the way through The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon of Kavalier & Clay fame. Loving it. It's an exciting detective story based on the premise that Israel failed and Jews have relocated to Alaska instead. Set months before the "reversion", when the Alaskan land will be returned to America, it is absolutely fantastic. It's a slightly easier read than Kavalier & Clay, mostly because the detective story aspect of it all makes for a very lively, fast-paced narrative. It's funny, too. Basically, it's just an incredibly well-written traditional detective novel, with some Chabonesque quirks as far as setting and characters goes. Can't wait to see how it ends, but kind of don't want to finish it.

duckula
03-07-2008, 09:57 AM
I've just finished Emma, thought it was time to read another Austen. As with Pride & Prejudice it was brilliantly observed and funny, a damn good read all in all.

Next up is a book of essays called Future Armies, Future Challenges about the changing nature of warfare. Looks to be an interesting read.

luis
03-07-2008, 10:58 AM
i read the last monds

ludlum, bourne idenity

bob evers 1-32(dutch books)

eragon1-2

the da vince code

hasselbrad
03-07-2008, 12:50 PM
I just read my divorce papers. I think I'm going to have to go back to court.
:|

Keira lover
14-07-2008, 11:03 PM
Just finished a book about Augustus, called AUGUSTUS

luis
25-07-2008, 02:31 PM
i read

ludlum,
the osterman weekend

and ludlum,
the the icarus agenda

Porcelain_Doll
01-08-2008, 11:28 PM
I've just finished "Mistress in the art of death", by Ariana Franklin.

I loved it, her main character is a Middle Ages Dr Brennan (from "Bones", just in case). The first chapters are a bit slow but the rest is great. It must've been awful hard creating a wild, CSI-like chase of a psycho children murderer, complete with racism and female doctors in a twelfth century Cambridge, and she pulls it off brilliantly. Awesome.

hasselbrad
02-08-2008, 12:18 AM
I've just finished "Mistress in the art of death", by Ariana Franklin.

I loved it, her main character is a Middle Ages Dr Brennan (from "Bones", just in case). The first chapters are a bit slow but the rest is great. It must've been awful hard creating a wild, CSI-like chase of a psycho children murderer, complete with racism and female doctors in a twelfth century Cambridge, and she pulls it off brilliantly. Awesome.

Have you ever read The Alienist by Caleb Carr? It's a 19th Century psychiatrist (alienist) and his associates on the trail of a serial killer. I shall have to find your recommendation.

Hollysince1985
13-08-2008, 06:46 AM
Portnoy's Complaint by Philip Roth

Hilarious!!!!!!

Ameriel
14-08-2008, 08:15 AM
I've just finished 'The world according to Garp' by John Irving.
It's a story about a young writer, his weird thoughts and his whole life. It's cool :D

Porcelain_Doll
21-08-2008, 08:35 PM
Have you ever read The Alienist by Caleb Carr? It's a 19th Century psychiatrist (alienist) and his associates on the trail of a serial killer. I shall have to find your recommendation.

Niiiice, I'll look it up!

Just finished "Blood and Chocolate". I know the movie's crap, but it has nothing to do with the book. I really enjoyed it, the author's brilliant. It's funny how she makes you realise humans have so much of beasts in them, you end up favouring the wonderful dual nature of werewolves. At least they can let their demons run free and hence get rid of them, as a character points out.
Easily one of my favourites.

Richard
05-09-2008, 01:06 AM
Deadly Illusions: Jean Harlow and the Murder of Paul Bern by Samuel Marx and Joyce Vanderveen.

The author of this book, Samuel Marx, once worked as story editor for MGM studios in the early 1930s, and it was during this period when he met and became friends with Paul Bern, then one of the studio's most popular and successful producers. During his days as an office boy for Universal Pictures, Marx had also met and befriended the soon-to-be famous producer Irving Thalberg, and it was Thalberg who hired Marx as story editor for MGM studio when he arrived there in 1930. Thalberg would eventually become one of the most famous film producers of his time before his untimely death in 1936.

The year is 1932, the morning after the Labor Day weekend when Marx received a telephone call informing him that his producer-friend Paul Bern, who was married to Jean Harlow at the time, was found dead in his home, an apparent suicide from a self-inflicted gunshot wound. When Marx arrived at the scene he found several of his colleagues were already there, including Thalberg, Louis B. Mayer and MGM's publicist Howard Strickling. Marx became suspicious when he learned that these men were at the house hours before the police were even notified.

Upon further reading we discover that Paul Bern was once married to a woman he knew and met long ago (during his theater days as an actor), and that this woman was mentally ill. Her name was Dorothy Millette, a stage actress who somehow became very sick and had to be institutionalized. Bern kept this secret from almost everyone he knew except for a select few; probably those he was very close to and trusted. We discover that Dorothy has now been released and is spending most of her time at a hotel in Sacramento. She begins to taunt Bern, who at this time is seen courting a young Jean Harlow, and expresses a desire to come back into his life and continue her aspiration to become an actress. In Dorothy's mind only a night has past, but in reality she has been in a coma for almost a decade. Marx claims that Bern was worried about how to handle the situation but seemed fine the last time he saw him.

The public knew nothing about this Dorothy Millette and it didn't reach newspapers until days after Bern's death. When it finally did reach the newspapers a nationwide search was conducted to locate the whereabouts of this mystery woman, and all that witnesses seem to know was that she was last seen on the Delta King, a steamboat that traveled between Sacramento and San Francisco. Dorothy Millette's belongings were left behind and never picked up, and she never got off the boat when it docked in Sacramento. Nobody knew what happened to her. All evidence pointed to suicide and people believed she jumped. A short time later her body was found in the Sacramento River.

Samuel Marx never believed the motive that became almost synonymous whenever someone mentioned the name Paul Bern; the man who killed himself because he couldn't make it with Jean Harlow, the man who was impotent. Marx claimed that Dorothy Millette -- her side, her story -- was more important than most people at the time were willing to let on. The triangle that made up the mystery, Marx claims, consisted of Paul, Dorothy and Harlow. Two of whom died the same year with Jean Harlow having only five more years left to live before dying of uremic poisoning in 1937. Marx also suspected a cover-up by the hands of certain figures at the MGM studio, a cover-up to withdraw any evidence that would create a scandal or tarnish the reputation of their young blonde bombshell, then on the rise of becoming one of the studio's biggest stars.

It is nice to read a book about something based on real events and knowing that the author himself was there and knew the people involved. But if you're truly immersed in the book you'll notice that there are some things which are almost entirely speculated upon and impossible to prove for the simple reason that both parties who were involved are dead. Nevertheless, Marx presents a credible argument to something that very well may have been a Hollywood myth all these years. I don't want to give anything away. It is such an engrossing book so read it. The final chapter is a jaw-dropping and utterly convincing finale to a good mystery. *** out of ****

Surprize
03-11-2008, 11:39 AM
Several books which screen version I have seen before reading. Atonement by Ian McEwan is written very professionaly, but sometimes it's too slow. Chocolat by Joanne Harris is a stream of consciousness, I don't like this fact at all as well as works of Virginia Wulf (we read them in the university, it's a part of curriculum of the History of Literature). The Devil Wears Prada is not bad, but the movie is quite better. The Other Boleyn Girl - too liittle history and too much indecency.

Urbanebula
07-11-2008, 01:26 AM
I'm currently reading Wintersmith by Terry Pratchett.

I can really get caught up in a Discworld novel becuase of Pratchett's writing style which incidentally is the same reason a lot of other people can't. I'm not much of a reader but I really enjoy writing my own short stories. I've recently started writing something that will hopefully develop into a novel.

Time will tell I guess.

Porcelain_Doll
13-11-2008, 05:08 AM
The Serpent's Tale, the second in the series of "Mistress in the Art of Death". Not quite as good as the first one, but still worth a read.

Interred with their Bones, by Jennifer Lee Carrell. Kinda DaVinci Code meets Shakespeare meets The Dante Club. Interesting, and had me guessing who the mysterious Shakespearean-death-imitating killer was till the end.

Nefertiti, by Michelle Moran. Brilliant, delicious reconstruction and writing. Told from the point of view of Mutnodjmet, Nefertiti's younger half-sister and of whom we know very little, shadowed by her famously beautiful and scandalous older sibling

Bastard out of Carolina, by Dorothy Allison. It's a harsh and honest read, and I ended up loving Bone (the main character, though her real name is Ruth Anne) and her family. The best thing about the book, in my opinion, was how the author weaved the family ties. The Boatwrights are so real, they almost jump off the pages...Bone's crazy but adoring uncles were the best...makes you wish for similarly kickass, ex-con, knives-and-guns-loving uncles who would tear towns apart in a heartbeat looking for the jerk who hurt you.

Elizabethine
14-11-2008, 04:31 PM
I have a book about Elisabeth (sissi) she is really interesting like persone....:).

eelliiinn
22-02-2009, 11:18 AM
I have started reading quite much again lately, and I like it. I just finished reading the Twilight series, and I fell in love. And I also just gave up on reading the Swedish version of Pride and Prejudice, (which i was supposed to read for Swedish class) and watched the film again instead, much easier that way ;)

Now I've just started reading Gossip Girl... again, and i think I might read Wuthering Heights soon, it seems good. :)

Elizabethine
22-02-2009, 11:38 AM
oh yes....TWILIGHT.....really cool...love it

michael22
23-02-2009, 03:05 AM
*cough twilight cough.....yeah.

I just read Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Practhett, interesting and funny. Worth a read if you can find it.

I also just read Barbarians an Alternative Roman history by Terry Jones. IT is really well informed and has interesting insights. Check it out if you are interested in the subject.

Kelsey
28-02-2009, 01:30 AM
For any Jane Austen fans out there, I have to recommend Syrie James's "The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen." I've had this book for a couple of years, but only just picked it up, and was amazed at how much I enjoyed it. I even teared up a bit at the end. A great read for the loyal Austen fan.

Joly
28-02-2009, 07:10 PM
Just finished The Hobbit and enjoyed it enough to start on LOTR. Thing is I only ever read like three or four times a week and rarely for more than hour. Could take me a while. :D

Surprize
03-03-2009, 04:46 AM
Breakfast at Tiffany's by Truman Capote. The movie was more touching and the ending was more inspiring and happier but the book was more realistic and not so romantic.
I have no time to read, but a friend of mine borrowed me a book by Honore de Balzac, so I have to find some time...

Porcelain_Doll
03-03-2009, 11:02 AM
I have a stack of books shouting to be read piled up on my nighttable...I'm such an idiot, if I can't seem to find time to read now; how will I manage once classes start? Gah.

I'm halfway through House of Spirits. Isabel Allende is not one of my favourites, I find her entertaining even if somewhat repetitive...still, I have most of her books (including the crazy Jaguar and Eagle series) but do cherish "Eva Luna". It's so honest and wonderfully weird. House of Spirits isn't bad, either, and the movie didn't do it justice...but I think I still prefer Eva :)

I've also begun The Angel's Game, by Carlos Ruiz Zafón.
I can't tell if it's as good as the first one, The Shadow of The Wind, which was simply brilliant and beautiful. (you must read it! At least give it a try, it's kinda like The Book Thief by Zusak (another of my all-time favourites), it's not for everybody but it deserves a shot.)

It's not really a sequel, but it appears to have some of the characters from The Shadow of The Wind, which was mainly what spurred me into purchasing this: I just have to know what happens to them! :D

Kelsey
03-03-2009, 10:33 PM
I hope you used your Barnes and Noble membership for those Porcelain :) (omg, I need a new job)

I just wanted to say that I loved The Book Thief, and I own Shadow of the Wind, I just have to actually start reading it.

I just finished Trailblazer, the new biography on Sarah Palin and was quite impressed. It called her on things that she needed to be called on, and praised her accomplishments worth praising. And it was interesting because a good majority of the book was just about what went wrong on the campaign trail and mistakes that were made. I understand it's not an ideal cup of tea for a lot of people, but if it is, it's a good read.

I'm currently working on Samantha Powers Problem From Hell: America in the Age of Genocide. I'm loving it so far, which is wierd, for a book about genocide.

Porcelain_Doll
07-03-2009, 06:39 PM
I hope you used your Barnes and Noble membership for those Porcelain :) (omg, I need a new job)


Barnes and Noble doesn't exist here :P
I would fill my house with books if it did. I get them either from Amazon.com (once or twice a year, since the shipping gets so expensive) or lent from a family friend who raids Amazon once a week.
It's hard to get books in English over here. I also want the "Bones" and "True Blood" seasons on DVD, but that would mean sweet-talking my father for ages until he agreed to lent me the money....I want a job so badly. Can I have yours?

Kelsey
09-03-2009, 12:23 AM
Barnes and Noble doesn't exist here :P
I would fill my house with books if it did. I get them either from Amazon.com (once or twice a year, since the shipping gets so expensive) or lent from a family friend who raids Amazon once a week.
It's hard to get books in English over here. I also want the "Bones" and "True Blood" seasons on DVD, but that would mean sweet-talking my father for ages until he agreed to lent me the money....I want a job so badly. Can I have yours?

Life without Barnes and Noble? My my, how do you survive?

I don't think True Blood is on DVD yet, but the first three seasons of Bones definitely are. Where are you located? I know Barnes and Noble online (BN.com) sends to some foreign countries...

Porcelain_Doll
31-03-2009, 08:41 PM
Life without Barnes and Noble? My my, how do you survive?

I don't think True Blood is on DVD yet, but the first three seasons of Bones definitely are. Where are you located? I know Barnes and Noble online (BN.com) sends to some foreign countries...

I don't know...via amazon.com when I have the money?
I'm in Uruguay, SA. I doubt B&N ships stuff here, when we order stuff it's from a mailbox in Florida and then from Florida they swim towards here...yes, it is painfully slow. I'll check the site nevertheless :)

luis
01-04-2009, 04:56 AM
you can try bol.com

Kelsey
01-04-2009, 07:14 PM
Uruguay? Oh that's rad!

I need a new book. Something good. Any suggestions?

michael22
01-04-2009, 10:11 PM
Ysabel, it is very good, well written with a engaging plot.

luis
02-04-2009, 01:22 PM
crusade in jeans maybe

Joly
02-04-2009, 03:56 PM
I'm in Uruguay

First thing I think of when someone mentions that country. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8wMLwsYxjA)

Porcelain_Doll
02-04-2009, 10:18 PM
Uruguay? Oh that's rad!

I need a new book. Something good. Any suggestions?

Sigh, so do I....let me know if you get your hands on something crazy good, please! :D

And rad? How?


First thing I think of when someone mentions that country. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8wMLwsYxjA)

I've never watched the Simpsons. I just don't find them funny.
Besides, it's not pronounced that way.


Edit: huh...this feels familiar. Probably I've been here and done this already...which not only makes you not funny, it also makes you unoriginal. :)

luis
07-04-2009, 05:45 PM
family guy!!!!!!!
the da vinci code is also a very good one

Kelsey
10-04-2009, 07:32 PM
I'm reading Vince Flynn's books right now. I just finished the first book "Term Limits" last night, and started the second one in the series a few minutes ago. They're awesome, and I'm pretty much ready to be a sniper now lol:)