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View Full Version : Can we go back to Oz, Toto?


Mandy
06-05-2007, 05:54 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070506/ap_on_re_us/severe_weather

Just, whoa.

hasselbrad
06-05-2007, 06:14 PM
Glad to see you are okay. I was scared when I saw that.

Mandy
06-05-2007, 06:48 PM
It's been pretty bad weather all weekend. Still a lot of rain, thunder and lightning right now until who knows when. Still not exactly in a safe zone. Bleh! Tornados are awesome until you get caught in one.

Porcelain_Doll
06-05-2007, 07:15 PM
I remember being 5 and terrified of tornados.
We lived in Florida at the time, and when my parents told me what tornados really were (according to my then-8-year-old sis, they were "birds or something") I just said very seriously: "Oh, no. I'm not staying here. Call Grandpa, tell him to pick me up. I'm going back with him!"

Needless to say, we don't get tornados in Uruguay. We do get incredible winds that wreck everything, but they're defined as "tornadoish". This "don't exaggerate, everything could be worse" attitude doesn't really define my country, but I'm getting off topic.

Ranman
06-05-2007, 09:45 PM
You have to be crazy to live in an
area where tornado's strike,
the only thing worse is living on an
island with an active volcano on it.

Leonie
06-05-2007, 10:45 PM
I never understand why so many houses out that way are made of wood-like structures. If you live in tornado alley, wouldn't it be an idea to invest in bricks? I'd imagine that's more expensive, yes, but it beats the repair bill for a wooden house, doesn't it?

Ranman
06-05-2007, 10:54 PM
These are they same people who voted for Bush
explains alot doesn't it

DanMan
07-05-2007, 07:26 PM
These are they same people who voted for Bush
explains alot doesn't it

umm...Good point Ranman!

There is a particularly unfortunate home on the corner of a big intersection
near the town I live in. It hase been hit by a tornado 3 times since the 1960's. The weirdest part is, the last 2 times it was the only house that
was severly damaged. :icon_err:

Hazzle
08-05-2007, 09:04 AM
I never understand why so many houses out that way are made of wood-like structures. If you live in tornado alley, wouldn't it be an idea to invest in bricks? I'd imagine that's more expensive, yes, but it beats the repair bill for a wooden house, doesn't it?

It's an American thing. Was discussing that when I was over there.

Apparently the theory is that if a brick house is destroyed, be it by a flood, earthquake, hurricane or tornado (don't forget, the country as a whole gets hit by pretty much every natural disaster you can think of) it costs a fortune to repair.

Of course brick houses are stronger therefore it would take a bigger natural diastaster to destroy a brick house than a wooden one but that's Americans for you.

Leonie
08-05-2007, 10:02 AM
I reckon, if your brick house gets destroyed, THEN get a wooden one.

hasselbrad
08-05-2007, 01:36 PM
Brick houses aren't really that much stronger than a solidly built wood frame structure. Brick, as it's used in the United States, is more of a veneer. Most brick houses here are framed and then simply bricked over, adding very little structural strength, but a fair amount of weight in the event of a collapse.
The only really safe houses are built of concrete block with steel reinforcing. But, if the roof gets ripped off, you're still up shit creek. Alot of houses are built this way in Florida, but they were forced to make code much more stringent after hurricane Andrew in 1992. Why, you ask? Because many builders weren't attaching the roof structure to the house with anything thing more than a few metal straps and they became giant frisbees.

Leonie
08-05-2007, 01:40 PM
Yikes.

My parents' house has brick walls, then insulation, then concrete, I think. The roof is supported by a wooden structure, but I'm fairly certain it's been attached with more than a few straps. The walls on the inside are all concrete-like. I should add that a wooden house would probably be more expensive out this way - we haven't a whole lot of forest, but plenty of clay to go around.

I thought a brick house would be stronger exactly because of the weight: it'll take a stronger wind to blow it over. I suppose if the structure is still crap, it hardly helps and just hits you in the head harder.

hasselbrad
08-05-2007, 02:01 PM
My grandfather was in construction. He built the house my father grew up in. All concrete block. Even the partition walls were block.
It will take a concerted, team effort by the four horseman of the apocalypse to bring that thing down.