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brownplayboy310
25-07-2006, 07:06 PM
Does anyone know how I can contact Keira's agent? I'm in the process of writing a screenplay and I have the perfect part for her. She was actually the person I had in mind for the part. I want to get in touch with her agent ASAP before she makes any new commitments. This role will get her an Oscar for best supporting actress if she can handle it.

Foeni
25-07-2006, 07:13 PM
Register at IMDBpro. You should be able to see the contact information for her agent.

Hazzle
25-07-2006, 10:10 PM
Or try the "contact" link for PFD on the front page.

Her agent (last I checked) is Lindy King.

barrington
25-07-2006, 10:38 PM
You might have a wonderful screenplay, but unless you have the financial clout and reputation to produce funding for an entire movie, you won't get anywhere. Best of luck all the same.

Psuedo-Black
25-07-2006, 10:56 PM
Is that really how movies start out though? Like someone writes the movie and then picks up some people and decides to do it? Like just like that?

hasselbrad
25-07-2006, 11:02 PM
Is that really how movies start out though? Like someone writes the movie and then picks up some people and decides to do it? Like just like that?
That's how Kevin Smith did Clerks. He maxed out his credit cards to do it.
Sometimes, getting a script read by talent gets a project greenlighted simply because the talent wants to do it. Keira's currently #2 on the IMDB starmeter, so, theoretically, if she were to read his script and love it, it could get produced, based simply on the fact that she wants to star in it.
Generally, though, a writer needs to start out writing low-budget films that independent producers can afford to make. That's the tack that I am taking at the moment.

Digital_Ice
26-07-2006, 12:32 AM
This role will get her an Oscar for best supporting actress if she can handle it.

Now *that* is confidence in your work!

blastedew
26-07-2006, 06:37 AM
Is that really how movies start out though? Like someone writes the movie and then picks up some people and decides to do it? Like just like that?

Not really, some cases its very rare
movie is produced by the movie company.
like warner bros or disney. and the producers
propose a contract and they support them with funds and movis.
producers can only do this becuz not any body can go to holywood
and knock on the door of warner bros and give them the proposal

blastedew
26-07-2006, 06:42 AM
and everyone keeps saying keira is #2 in starmeter in imdb??
where does it say.
mine says shes 8th

Digital_Ice
26-07-2006, 09:34 AM
dont... double... .post.

Sandra
26-07-2006, 03:36 PM
Does anyone know how I can contact Keira's agent? I'm in the process of writing a screenplay and I have the perfect part for her. She was actually the person I had in mind for the part. I want to get in touch with her agent ASAP before she makes any new commitments. This role will get her an Oscar for best supporting actress if she can handle it.

You'll need an agent yourself. Then your agent has to pimp your screenplay to a studio who will pick it up, and then the casting producer will contact Key's agent. I guess if your screenplay gets picked up by a studio, your agent can send it to Key's agent. If Keira likes it and really wants it, she might fight to get the part.
It's hardly the person who writes the screenplay who gets to cast it.

brownplayboy310
26-07-2006, 06:51 PM
why are there so many dream-killers on this board?

Foeni
26-07-2006, 07:27 PM
It's not about dream-killing. It's about being a little realistic, people are just telling you how it works to help you.

Sandra
26-07-2006, 07:54 PM
why are there so many dream-killers on this board?It's like Foeni said. I personally didn't make my post to kill your dream. I think it's great that you have written a screenplay and you would like Keira play a part in that.
But then again I think you should tone down the "This role will get her an Oscar for best supporting actress if she can handle it."

I want to get in the movie biz aswell, and I've tried writing many screenplays and never ended finishing one. I guess I don't have the attention span at the mo and thats why I'm getting into directing instead. You should register for an IMDB account, then you can get contact with people and learn about the biz.

It's just about being realistic and knowing how things work. Good luck!

Foeni
26-07-2006, 08:09 PM
Registering at IMDBpro would be a good idea. I think there's a phone number to her agent there, instead of just the adress you can find on KKW. Not entirely sure, though. I just know that some agents have their phone number on IMDB. And a good luck from Denmark as well.

hasselbrad
26-07-2006, 09:29 PM
why are there so many dream-killers on this board?
It's not dream-killing...it's called reality.
If you have a screenplay written, take a really hard look at it before you start submitting it to agents. Is it formatted properly? Is it free of any and all errors? If you think it's ready, let a few other people read it and make sure. You don't want to send out a screenplay to several agencies that's loaded with grammatical errors. That's a sure way to make sure your screenplay goes straight in the circular file.
Of course, before you send a screenplay to an agent, you'll need to send a query letter. If they are interested in what you have, they'll contact you.
Here (http://www.wgaeast.org/about_the_writers_guild/agency_list.html) is a handy guide to going about this process. Of course, before you send it out you'll need to copywright it. I've been told that registering your script through the WGA is the only way to go. Many agencies and studios won't even look at a script that's been registered anywhere but the WGA. That includes the Library of Congress.
If you're thinking about sending a script to a studio. Stop. Don't.
I've been told that most studios throw those scripts directly into the trash. They won't even open them, for fear of being sued. You can thank Art Buchwald for this development. After he sued Eddie Murphy over Coming to America, studios got very skittish about looking at anything that didn't come from an agent through the proper channels.

You could always send your script to Keira's agent and hope that;
A. She (the agent) doesn't dump it in the garbage straightaway.
B. She actually passes the script on to Keira.
C. Keira takes the time to read it.
D. Likes it.
E. Is willing to play a supporting role in it.
F. Is willing to help produce it.
G. Is, at the very least, willing to get it to producers.

You could also hope that Keira crawls into bed with you tonight.

kingdumbass
27-07-2006, 12:21 AM
If she was willing to go through all the trouble of getting a movie produced, she could just get her mum to write one....
I don't think he has quite that much clout, anyway.

brownplayboy310
27-07-2006, 07:06 PM
i doubt that her mum could tell the same story that i am telling.

Sandra
27-07-2006, 08:24 PM
i doubt that her mum could tell the same story that i am telling.

:icon_surp

hasselbrad
27-07-2006, 08:30 PM
:icon_surp
He's not the first...and he won't be the last.
I'll admit it, a couple of the screenplays I've written, I envision Keira in the lead role as I am writing. However, if I sell one, they can cast Judi Dench in it for all I care. I just want to get paid. :D

brownplayboy310
27-07-2006, 09:54 PM
He's not the first...and he won't be the last.
I'll admit it, a couple of the screenplays I've written, I envision Keira in the lead role as I am writing. However, if I sell one, they can cast Judi Dench in it for all I care. I just want to get paid. :D

hmm, this is actually my first screenplay. and after consulting with a few folks in the biz and letting people see it for the first time I'm not so sure of myself anymore. i think i need to take a class because apparently i have some serious format issues. i also need to restructure the story because it doesn't draw the reader in quickly enough. and according to these folks its also way too long. but aren't epics supposed to be long? and whose to say that you can't write an epic about a drug dealer's search for god?

hasselbrad
27-07-2006, 10:29 PM
Get a screenwriting program. I have seen a basic program in CompUSA for about $40.00. I use Final Draft 6. If I ever start making any money, I'll upgrade. Final Draft and Movie Magic are two of the best programs, but they'll set you back $150 or more. However, the investment is well worth it when you are able to forget about formatting and just write.
Also, get a screenwriting format book. The guy I just took a class from recommends this book. (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0929583000/104-5351782-7691951?v=glance&n=283155) I bought a different one, but for the price Amazon has this for, I'd get it.
Taking a class is a great idea. I took a six-week class and it has really helped me to understand conflict and how to use it.
Also, the guy who taught it explained how to write for budget. I know what it's like to have an epic piece burning a hole in your cranium, but the reality of the situation is that you will probably have to write screenplays with few characters and limited scenes and/or locations for a while. Independent film makers have to be very creative with their budgets.
I think it costs somewhere around $100,000 per day to shoot outdoors (city) because of all of the crowd control issues, etc. Special effects and action sequences are budget busters as well. Selling something to a big studio right out of the box is the longest of longshots. Executives and producers want writers that they can stake large production budgets to.
If the story is strong, think about stripping it down to the bare essentials and drilling down to the core values of your characters. Figure out ways to tell the story without car chases and shootouts, and you might find an indie film company that is willing to produce it.