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hasselbrad
19-04-2006, 07:52 PM
What do you know about the Boudiccan revolt? I saw a program on History Channel International (I'm trying to "globalize myself" dammit!), but it was only 30 minutes long. I've nosed about on the internets, but everything says basically the same thing.
I was hoping some of you knew of stories and legends that grew out of what happened, that I might be able to work into something I've started writing.
Thank you, in advance.

Leonie
19-04-2006, 07:55 PM
You mean the woman who kicked some pre-English arse? Otherwise, I'll go back to studying and shut up.

(And for all you smartarses out there, I know I'm not British, I just watch the Discovery Channel far too often.)

hasselbrad
19-04-2006, 08:02 PM
You mean the woman who kicked some pre-English arse? Otherwise, I'll go back to studying and shut up.

(And for all you smartarses out there, I know I'm not British, I just watch the Discovery Channel far too often.)

She led the Britons on a rampage that kicked a bunch of Roman arse around 60 AD.
Since I don't have my time machine :mad: I figured I'd ask.

Leonie
19-04-2006, 08:12 PM
I remember watching this show on her presented by Lucy Lawless (yes, Xena) for Discovery or National Geographic or something, but it's been a while. I remember this one story of her being taken to face whoever was in charge there at that stage, and actually being able to reason with them, because they saw her point, after which some Roman bastard who'd been backstabbing her got killed by his own boss. Something like that.

After I'm done poisoning my brain, trying to absorb 180 pages of sociolinguistic pain, I'll see what I remember :)

hasselbrad
19-04-2006, 08:24 PM
The story I have (from all the sources I've seen) was that she was queen of the Iceni tribe. Her husband, Prasutagus, had willed half of the empire to her and his daughters and the other half to Nero. When he died, the Romans annexed all of it. She protested and they flogged her publicly and raped her daughters.
She, as you might imagine, got a wee bit ticked and started rampaging through the south of Britain. They burned Camulodunum (Colchester), Londinium (London) and Verulamium (St. Albans), while managing to wipe out at least one legion before being drawn into a large scale battle in, as far as anyone can tell, the West Midlands area. There, her army suffered a crushing defeat.
She allegedly drank poison and died and is rumored to be buried under King's Cross Station in London. I find nothing about what happened to the daughters, or even their names, for that matter.

duckula
19-04-2006, 08:27 PM
When in doubt, Wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boudica).

hasselbrad
19-04-2006, 08:40 PM
When in doubt, Wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boudica).

I was hoping for local myths that y'all may have. :p

duckula
19-04-2006, 08:43 PM
Well I heard that she liked to kill Romans with a large stone dildo.

hasselbrad
19-04-2006, 08:51 PM
Well I heard that she liked to kill Romans with a large stone dildo.

See...that's what I'm looking for. That's juicy as all get out. ;)

It is interesting to me because one of the possible places for the battle is in Leicestershire...which is where one of my family tree's roots is buried.

EmotionSickness
19-04-2006, 09:06 PM
My dad calls one of my cats Boudicca because she's tough, I guess.

The story of Boudicca is a long and interesting one. I'm not British, so I don't think I have much to add to this thread other than to tell you to keep your eyes on the History Channel (as if they aren't already); quite a few specials on her have been running in the past few months.

Jacoby
19-04-2006, 09:37 PM
"Boudicca" reminds me of cheese. It's a type of cheese right? (cultured)

duckula
19-04-2006, 10:50 PM
"Boudicca" reminds me of cheese. It's a type of cheese right? (cultured)

It's like stilton, apparently.

barrington
19-04-2006, 10:51 PM
I'm from Norfolk in England, where Boudica ruled the Iceni tribe. She is very much a part of our local culture and historical heritage. A lot of historical sites at home relate to her and there's plenty of ruins to see. Boudica was a real local hero. One of her settlements, still visible above-ground with walls and earthworks, is about 10 minutes from my house. Will get pictures next time I'm there if anyone fancies.

Though, in Norfolk, we know her as "Bodicea" not Boudicca.

hasselbrad
19-04-2006, 11:22 PM
You have no idea how jealous I am of your historical sites.
I used to own a house in the "historical" district here in Tampa. It was built in 1927. That's "new" construction to y'all :icon_err:
Tampa, by and large, is around 100 years old. Before that, it was Fort Brooke, and then it had only existed for about 60 years. Sure, there's a lot of history as far as the Indians are concerned, but we pretty much obliterated all of that.
St. Augustine, Florida is as old as it gets in the States, but then that only goes back about 1/4 as far in time as the settlements you speak of.
And, yes I would fancy pictures.

Rob The BLack Douglas
19-04-2006, 11:58 PM
New Mexico has some pretty old history going back to the spanish years, Santa Fe is the oldest capital in the US going back further than the founding of United States.

Hasselbrad, keep an eye on the regular History Channel as well, they have a two hour show about Boudicca that is pretty good and I believe the BBc did a drama about her at some point as well.

Rob

Leonie
20-04-2006, 06:04 AM
Though, in Norfolk, we know her as "Bodicea" not Boudicca.

If I'm not mistaken her actual name was Boudicca though. Someone screwed up copying down some of her legend, and mistook the second c for an e or somethings. gg.

EmotionSickness
20-04-2006, 02:02 PM
Though, in Norfolk, we know her as "Bodicea" not Boudicca.

Just out of curiousity, how do you pronounce that? My Americanized tongue is inclined to say "boh-dee-see-uh" or "bo-dee-shuh".

Here we just say "boh-dik-uh". I don't even know if that's right. Apparently, there are about six different spellings and even more pronunciations.

Also, Brad, an interesting tidbit: I read in a Mel Gibson interview a year or two ago that he was planning on making a film about the legendary lady. Or at least he wanted to. I think that would be just dandy. She's like.. the female William Wallace to me, haha.

hasselbrad
20-04-2006, 03:57 PM
Just out of curiousity, how do you pronounce that? My Americanized tongue is inclined to say "boh-dee-see-uh" or "bo-dee-shuh".

Here we just say "boh-dik-uh". I don't even know if that's right. Apparently, there are about six different spellings and even more pronunciations.

Also, Brad, an interesting tidbit: I read in a Mel Gibson interview a year or two ago that he was planning on making a film about the legendary lady. Or at least he wanted to. I think that would be just dandy. She's like.. the female William Wallace to me, haha.
Yeah, I read that when I was looking at Wikipedia. It doesn't show up on IMDB though so I'm wondering if it's been shelved while he's working on his other dead language project.
All of this is for a screenplay I'm writing, so hopefully it's been shelved. ;)

Digital_Ice
20-04-2006, 05:15 PM
Just out of curiousity, how do you pronounce that? My Americanized tongue is inclined to say "boh-dee-see-uh" or "bo-dee-shuh".

you were right the first time "boh-dee-see-uh"

AureaMediocritas
23-04-2006, 09:19 PM
http://www.britannia.com/history/docs/tacitus.html

Might be interesting what a near contemporary historian thought of her. Apart from the translation, you can deduce your own interpretations.

hasselbrad
25-04-2006, 11:01 PM
http://www.britannia.com/history/docs/tacitus.html

Might be interesting what a near contemporary historian thought of her. Apart from the translation, you can deduce your own interpretations.

Yeah, I've read most of those accounts. There's not really any mention of the daughters, so I guess I'll have a wee bit of license. Schweet.