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View Full Version : What Book Have You Read Today?


Kelsey
27-01-2006, 08:09 PM
This could be a sister thread to "What movie...." Since I'm always looking for a good book, I thought this could be a fun thread. I'm sure there has been a similar one in the past (favorite books, etc.), but let's see if this one takes off.

About five minutes ago, I finished The Broker by Grisham.

Leonie
27-01-2006, 08:19 PM
How embarrassing - Shopaholic Abroad by Sophie Kinsella. However, I read Sense & Sensibility (Jane Austen) before that, so I suppose that makes it OK :icon_bigg

Kelsey
27-01-2006, 08:24 PM
I've never read the Shopaholic series, but I like Sophie Kinsella. Have you read "Can you Keep a Secret?"

Leonie
27-01-2006, 08:39 PM
Nope. I was lucky enough to obtain the English version of the second Shopaholic book in my town's tiny little library, and only 2 years after I read the first book. Such speedy service :icon_bigg

bruman
27-01-2006, 09:41 PM
finished 'The of the Rose' by Umberto Eco 5 days ago
pritty good, if you don't read the few boring parts :P

Kelsey
27-01-2006, 09:48 PM
I could send them to you if you want to read them without waiting years. I have a pretty good discount at BN. :).

Leonie
27-01-2006, 10:07 PM
Only if you read them first :icon_bigg Your life won't be the same after you discover the financial disaster that is Becky Bloomwood. I admire her creativity in getting away with a debt that's Bill Gates' fortune in debet. What I might do is take advantage of my last days at the bookshop and see if they have them there. Thanks though :)

My new read is The Master and Margarita by Bulgakov. I had to read it for literature 100 (which was about a year ago), but never got to finish it (I read all 14 other books! but this was at the end of the semester). The bits I did read were awesome. The book is a complete mindfuck, it's incredible. It manages to be confusing without being annoying, which is rare.

Kelsey
28-01-2006, 12:14 AM
I started Watership Down by Richard Adams today. Kind of dreading it, despite the fact that I am reading it voluntarily.

Anyone read it?

Renegade
28-01-2006, 05:06 AM
I just finished Heart of Darkness for my english class. Eh, it was okay.

DragonRat
28-01-2006, 08:49 AM
Since this semester started, I've read Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea, Palahniuk's Fugitives & Refugees: A Walk Through Portland, OR, Asimov's Foundation Trilogy (and Prelude to Foundation), Watson's The Double Helix: A Personal Account of the Discovery of DNA, and Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle. I'm in the process of reading Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita (which, by the way, Leonie, is getting to be an incredibly interesting read), and Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (yeah, it seems improbable that I have not read that yet).

marine
28-01-2006, 02:33 PM
I finished Oliver Twist Wednesday and started Jane Eyre.

AureaMediocritas
28-01-2006, 03:50 PM
I re-read Ian Kershaw´s Hitler biography consisting of two volumes "Hybris" and "Nemesis" for the second time. Brilliant stuff for those interested in the subject.

EmotionSickness
28-01-2006, 05:10 PM
I don't usually have time to read a book in a day, but I did manage to finish God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian by Kurt Vonnegut yesterday. Anyone else read this one?

Dragronrat: did you enjoy Cat's Cradle? That, along with Breakfast of Champions, are my two favorites by Vonnegut. Well, they're two of my all-time favorites, period. I also see that you're a Joyce fan. Ulysses is my favorite book... ever. We seem to have a lot in common, as far as literature is concerned.

Rob The BLack Douglas
28-01-2006, 05:23 PM
I'm reading The Wine-Dark Sea by Patrick O'Brian. The Aubrey-Maturin books are the equivelent of literary crack. :D

Leonie
28-01-2006, 05:59 PM
Want to read a good book?

Read The Sleeping Father by Matthew Sharpe. Not only is Matthew Sharpe a really nice guy, the book is amazing. It manages to be both touching and hilarious, tragic and sweet. It's a pack of contradictions, and one of my favourite books.

Tabrasa
28-01-2006, 07:29 PM
Just finished the Fifth Elephant by Terry Pratchett, and am now reading Monstrous Regiment by the same. In a light-hearted reading mood lately, and Pratchett fits the bill.

Tab

DragonRat
29-01-2006, 04:18 AM
Dragronrat: did you enjoy Cat's Cradle? That, along with Breakfast of Champions, are my two favorites by Vonnegut. Well, they're two of my all-time favorites, period. I also see that you're a Joyce fan. Ulysses is my favorite book... ever. We seem to have a lot in common, as far as literature is concerned.

Cat's Cradle definitely beat Slaughterhouse-Five for my favorite Vonnegut novel so far (well, considering I've only read those two; Breakfast of Champions I do plan to read next from Vonnegut).

As for Joyce, I'm reading his Portrait of the Artist... as my own little preparation for reading Ulysses in my English class. (Because the theme of the class is '1922', we're also reading Eliot's The Waste Land.) I wouldn't know for certain if I like him yet. I did read a few of his stories from Dubliners, and while some were pretty thick, others were quite good.

Oh, and I also finished Milan Kundera's The Book of Laughter and Forgetting, which was his first novel, and showcases a lot of ideas that he portrays in his seminal work The Unbearable Lightness of Being.

Leonie
29-01-2006, 08:30 AM
I have Kundera's The Unbearable Lightness of Being. Had to purchase it for a literature course, but we never got to it. The teacher knew the writer or something, and I dare say was a big fan of Kundera's writing.

We read one story from Milan Kundera's Laughable Loves, namely The Hitchhiking Game. It wasn't bad or anything, but it didn't strike me as really-interesting-must-read-more either.

DefyingGravity
29-01-2006, 01:57 PM
Franny and Zooey by J.D. Salinger. It's quite good, I'm enjoying it much more than Catcher in the Rye, which I didn't like at all.

Leonie
29-01-2006, 03:59 PM
Franny and Zooey by J.D. Salinger. It's quite good, I'm enjoying it much more than Catcher in the Rye, which I didn't like at all.
You didn't like Catcher in the Rye? I can't relate to that at all, I loved it :icon_bigg I read it for my English reading list in high school. At the end, a lot of my class mates came to me to ask for books that were fun, not too hard, and had a bit of credit to them (I'm an infamous bookaholic). I ended up recommending this book so many times that I think at least half my year read it :icon_bigg

duckula
29-01-2006, 04:16 PM
Catcher in the Rye did nothing for me.

Leonie
29-01-2006, 05:14 PM
It's not the best book known to mankind, but I liked it. It was one of those books that took no effort to finish. If half a year of students in their final year thought it was readable it can't be too bad, can it? :)

However, really liking a book (or not) will always be a matter of taste I suppose. I know Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert is considered to be a classic, but it's so badly written that it ruins the story - in my humble opinion of course :icon_razz It's tediously minute it pisses me off. I saw the movie version by Claude Chabrol, and as far as I and my literature professor know, that film followed the story pretty closely. The story isn't bad - it's the going on and on and on about the hats of people that drives me nuts. This thread had nothing to do with Madame Bovary before. Look what I've done!

Carry on :)

Ranman
29-01-2006, 07:29 PM
Catcher in the Rye did nothing for me.

Me either, however Corned beef on rye, now thats good

DragonRat
29-01-2006, 11:40 PM
I read Catcher in the Rye twice - once as a sophomore in high school, and again more recently as a third year in college - and each time the response has been different. Originally, I considered Holden a misunderstood fellow, one who obviously thinks himself older than he really is, but underneath just a cry for help. After reading it again, I just think Holden's an idiot and a self-absorbed solipsist (redundant). But then again, the time between readings - four years - could have really changed my mindset.

Viper_PL
06-02-2006, 07:25 PM
I read "The Satanists" yesterday...this book was really boring:icon_icon I think I will read my Maths book :read: <lol> It should be more interesting...

Lizzie Bennet
07-02-2006, 12:00 AM
Yesterday I read "The Second Summer of the Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants" and today I finished "Girls in Pants: The Third Summer of the Sisterhood" Tomorrow I will be starting "Emma"

Ashley
09-02-2006, 04:42 AM
I loved Catcher in the Rye. I have a tendency of thinking thinks like he does... which isn't really good for me and people but whatever.

I finished A Million Little Pieces a month or so ago. And I don't give two shits what Oprah says, it's still a good book in my opinion. Good story, I don't care if it's fabricated. I also read the follow-up My Friend Leonard, which was good for about a 3rd of it. Then it just got boring.

I'm reading Running with Scissors now, not too into yet so I won't speak of it.

I'm also reading A War To Be Won for a history course. I heart World War II history.

hasselbrad
09-02-2006, 04:34 PM
http://www.richardminiter.com/images/book_covers/disinformation_150.jpg

and

http://www.richardminiter.com/images/book_covers/shadow_war_cover_150.jpg

Very interesting. He has a lot of footnotes that I want to check out for myself.

From Disinformation:
-Bin Laden was never funded by the CIA. He provides two separate interviews with a reporter from The Guardian where Bin Laden flatly denies it. Then, he backs it up with information from other sources that verify it. Apparently, the CIA money was being funnelled through Pakistan and going to the Afghan troops who now comprise the Northern Alliance. The money Bin Laden was raising came from Islamic countries and was funnelled through Saudi Arabia and went to the "jihadists" who had travelled to Afghanistan, and now comprise the Taliban.
-Bin Laden is not bankrolling the operation with his vast fortune. He was cut off years ago and much of his assets have been frozen. Instead, Al-Qaeda funds its activities through money received from Islamic charities and credit card fraud.
-Bin Laden is not on dialysis.
-The Mexican border is not the United States' biggest concern, but rather the Canadian.
-"Suitcase" nukes are science-fiction.
-Large amounts of enriched, yellow-cake uranium have been found in Iraq, along with 7,000,000 documents pertaining to WMD programs.

Shadow War is more about what we have done right, and wrong, so far in hunting down terrorists.

Fascinating stuff.

michael22
11-02-2006, 02:06 AM
today I read le morte de Arthur by sir Thomas Malory.
This is a great book that for once I did not finish withiin an hour of starting.
The themes of chivalry and honour are fantastic.
Though most of you have probably already read this

acliff
12-02-2006, 12:03 AM
I'm in the process of learning and studying The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene. After which I'm going to read more books on how to fuck people over with your mind, or some good old fiction.

deviljet88
12-02-2006, 12:25 AM
Read Triage as according to the school English course. 'Deep' stuff about war and the psychological costs.

AMBER
12-02-2006, 10:19 AM
influenced by the move"pp", I've just finished "Persuasion" by Jane Austen, and really love this novel!!!

peach
13-02-2006, 02:53 PM
I've been reading pocket books and now i can't stop reading them. My cousin got loads of them everywhere in my apartment and I thought I never want that myself. One time I was a bit bored and picked up one of her books. I want to stop before I get too many but the stories can be so sweet.
It's nothing I can recommend.

Leonie
13-02-2006, 02:57 PM
Alright, I'm looking for a fairly easy read with *some* substance to it - any recommendations? Basically, I want a book that will take me out of reality for the whole 4 hours it will take me to finish the thing :icon_bigg Let's hear it :)

Lizzie Bennet
13-02-2006, 03:18 PM
The Series of Unfourtunate Events books are decent. Each book takes about two hours to read.

peach
13-02-2006, 03:26 PM
I haven't read this book for such a long time. You have all probably heard of it and maybe even read it. The Horse Whisperer written by Nicholas Evans. The books is basicly about trust, love and being able to find that trust and being happy again despite all bad that happened.
I don't want to give away anyhting, you should read it if you haven't already. The movie is also good.

Jessie T
14-02-2006, 01:49 PM
Right now I should be reading Labowitz, "Physical Chemestry: problems and solutions" but I don't think it'ts interenting... Last week I re-re-re-re read 'EXCALIBUR' by Bernard Cornwell.

sicrowe
14-02-2006, 11:27 PM
Hello! This is my first post...

Just read The Good Life by Jay McInerney, a novel of an adulterous relationship in the wake of 9-11. Pretty good, but got a bit tired of it by the end....

Rob The BLack Douglas
15-02-2006, 02:13 AM
The Savage Tales of Solomon Kane by Robert E. Howard, classic swashbuckling adventure from the creator of Conan.

DragonRat
15-02-2006, 05:07 AM
I finished reading Matthew Pearl's The Dante Club, a fictional account of how the Fireside Poets (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, James Russell Lowell, Oliver Wendell Holmes, etc.), in their attempt to translate Dante into English, managed to foil a murderer whose crimes fit the punishments in the Inferno. The author combines high-brow 19th-century intellectual humor with an amazing knowledge of Dantean literature. It's a pretty good read, and it reads pretty quickly.

kingdumbass
15-02-2006, 09:07 AM
Read Triage as according to the school English course. 'Deep' stuff about war and the psychological costs.

Triage, by Scott Anderson?
I read that a few years ago. A good, short novel.

I am currently reading "Lincoln", by Carl SAndburg. A biography of, of course, Abraham Lincoln.

deviljet88
15-02-2006, 10:37 AM
Yeah that's the one. They used it a few years ago as a year 12 high school text, but they've dropped it back to year 11 now. Stacks of questions on war and its effects... much fun.

EmotionSickness
15-02-2006, 12:26 PM
You should read A Tale of Two Cities, Leonie.




























Hahaha, jk. That's the most boring shit ever. I'd recommend anything else by Salinger (not Catcher in the Rye). Franny and Zooey is a light, entertaining read which combines two interrelated stories; an old favorite of mine. Something by Vonnegut would suit you well, I think (for a shorter read, I'd recommend Slaughterhouse V, if you haven't read it yet and for a very short read, God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian). You're keen and funny enough to appreciate his signature brand of cynicism and sharp, indelible wit. :)

Ranman
21-02-2006, 06:28 PM
I read a script for I am Legend that I downloaded today. I loved it.
I'm a huge sci-fi fan. I know its not a book, but it was good reading.

Jacoby
21-02-2006, 07:30 PM
I read a script for I am Legend that I downloaded today. I loved it.
I'm a huge sci-fi fan. I know its not a book, but it was good reading.

I am Legend is a book written by Richard Matheson. It kicks ass.

calereneau
21-02-2006, 08:35 PM
I read "Female Chauvinist Pigs" by Ariel Levy

calereneau
21-02-2006, 08:38 PM
I am currently reading "Lincoln", by Carl SAndburg. A biography of, of course, Abraham Lincoln.

Sufjan Stevens is visited by the ghost of Carl Sandburg in a dream.

Tabrasa
22-02-2006, 12:45 AM
Re-Reading Terry Pratchet, starting with "Colour of Magic" right now.

Tab

Richard
26-02-2006, 05:13 AM
I've just finished "Knowing Hepburn And Other Curious Experiences" by James Prideaux, and it took me about 2 months to read it. It's not that I'm a slow reader, really I'm not, it's just that I don't devote enough time to reading daily. On average, I read 4-5 pages a day. I should read as much as I do watching movies, but I don't.

The book is basically about his relationship with Katharine Hepburn and other various encounters with celebrities in and out of television. I think he's a marvelous writer. Witty, intelligent, and with a good sense of humor. He's lead a fascinating life.

I plan to purchase next "Audrey Hepburn: A Son Remembers", has anyone read this? ES, I know you have!

michael22
16-03-2006, 03:44 AM
The Summer Tree by Guy Gavrel Kay

a great book that sets the stage for susequent sequels 8/10

Kyrilka
18-03-2006, 12:00 AM
Hi all
Better books than i read was Dostoevskij and Remark.
My english very bed.. but i'ts intresting: read forum, message, know what you like read..
sorry :icon_redf

Mandy
18-03-2006, 12:06 AM
It's quite alright :D Lots of people here where English isn't the first language.
Make sure you read the posting guidelines here (http://www.kkwavefront.org/forums/showthread.php?t=46) before posting!

EmotionSickness
18-03-2006, 11:37 PM
I plan to purchase next "Audrey Hepburn: A Son Remembers", has anyone read this? ES, I know you have!

Haha, yes. Yes I have. It's a really great and quite touching piece of work. So, yeah.. it comes highly recommended (from me, anyway).

I just finished Liberwocky: What Liberals Say and What They Really Mean. A nice, short, brutally honest read. :icon_eplu ... that's the most mischevious looking emoticon I could find.

duckula
19-03-2006, 01:02 AM
I recently finished reading a book called Boyd: The Fighter Pilot Who Changed The Art Of War. It's a biography of a USAF pilot called John Boyd who revolutionised the thinking on how aircraft operate and should be designed and later in his life he developed theories on the human decision making and creative processes. It also adresses his thoughts on how one should live their life (but this is more subtextual, is that a word?).
I can reccommend this book to anyone who is not opposed to learning. It really had a massive impact for the positive on me.

michael22
20-03-2006, 01:05 PM
war and peace 10/10

PhoeniX
20-03-2006, 05:49 PM
war and peace 10/10

War and Peace is a great book.

marine
18-04-2006, 11:18 AM
Recently I read:
The Nanny Diaries and Bergdorf Blondes: there were ok I guess, I don't get all the hype about the Nanny Diaries, it was an enjoyable read though funny at times, but I expected more. The end was kind of a let down.

Bookends, it was really funny, I liked it a lot.
The Time Traveler's wife and My sister's keeper are great stories, imo. I really loved them.

Leonie
18-04-2006, 03:43 PM
Nanny Diaries is quite lame, there's far better chick lit out there in my opinion.

I recently finished Carlos Ruiz Zafón's The Shadow of the Wind. Loved it. It's so honest about being truly traditional to the point of being tacky - it's a novel that knows it's old school-style, and just indulges in it completely. I thought it was a great read. First book in ages that I haven't been able to put down.

Rob The BLack Douglas
19-04-2006, 05:04 AM
Just finished "NIGHT WATCH" by Sarah Waters. Another high quality piece of lesbian lit set during WWII from the author of TIPPING THE VELVET.

Swordsman
19-04-2006, 11:11 PM
i just finished Slaughter House Five by Kurt Vonnegut. it was some trippy stuff. i just started Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick. so far it's pretty hot.

michael22
20-04-2006, 09:01 AM
thee book of five rings
it is a old japanese treatise on swordplay
by miamoto musashi
very good considering I have read thousands of books on swordplay. very interesting, not my favourite fighting style but still very goo 8/10

Leonie
26-05-2006, 08:23 PM
I've never read the Shopaholic series, but I like Sophie Kinsella. Have you read "Can you Keep a Secret?"

I have now, finally. I quite enjoyed it - normally, chick lit is fairly predictable, and this one doesn't abandon the standard format, but somehow it manages to be a lot more original than most of what's out there. Quite liked it.

I then re-read The Cranberry Queen (Kathleen DeMarco) for the 122nd time. Still like it. I'm assembling all my books and taking them home tomorrow, and there's a couple in there I haven't read yet, so I might finally get round to doing that too. Summer holidays are good.

In other news - has anyone read the Portable Dorothy Parker and is it as good as I hope it will be? Secondly, has anyone read either of Bill Bryson's two books on language? I'm thinking of buying the lot of them, and I'd be interested to see what other people thought of them :)

once_dreaded
26-05-2006, 11:15 PM
Ummm in the last two weeks I've re-read books 1-5 of Harry Potter cuz I'm such a Hufflepuff dork and HP fan. NEENER!!!! I would be re-reading book 6 again if I didn't think it was a crime that it's so expensive in all the stores...damn ex has custody of all my books *le pout*

Kelsey
27-05-2006, 04:59 AM
I'm just finishing "Story of an African Farm" - I have maybe five pages left. I'm trying to switch off reading a classic then a newer, more popular book. "African Farm" is South African literature from the 1800s. I'm enjoying it a *lot* more than I thought I would, it's really good...but sad. Not bad for picking it up off the 50% off table.

SeattleGirl
27-05-2006, 09:50 AM
today....i put my head into an extremely thick book on biology ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~so terrible !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Fran
27-05-2006, 10:40 AM
I'm reading How I Live Now - Meg Rossoff.

:)

frodo1511
28-05-2006, 04:19 AM
Let's look at this in retrospec:

M:I:III, even having Tom Cruise as the main man, only dished up 50 million the first weekend open. It's going downhill from there.

Poseidon tanked. End of Story

The Da Vinci Code had the 13th best opening weekend ever in the states, and scored 250 million internationally in it's first three days, second only to Revenge of the Sith. I'll continue to do great, but not amazing.


X-Men will drag all the comic book fans in, but will die down later on in the summer.

Superman, I pray to God, will do great. It'll make a lot of money, but it'll come up short.

PotC II will be phenominal @ the B.O., just like three years ago. I personally am not looking forward to it, but every teenage girl in the world is. 300 million easily just in the States alone.

Hazzle
28-05-2006, 04:23 AM
Let's look at this in retrospec:

M:I:III, even having Tom Cruise as the main man, only dished up 50 million the first weekend open. It's going downhill from there.

Poseidon tanked. End of Story

The Da Vinci Code had the 13th best opening weekend ever in the states, and scored 250 million internationally in it's first three days, second only to Revenge of the Sith. I'll continue to do great, but not amazing.


X-Men will drag all the comic book fans in, but will die down later on in the summer.

Superman, I pray to God, will do great. It'll make a lot of money, but it'll come up short.

PotC II will be phenominal @ the B.O., just like three years ago. I personally am not looking forward to it, but every teenage girl in the world is. 300 million easily just in the States alone.

Wrong thread, methinks.

Swordsman
28-05-2006, 04:39 AM
Batman: The Long Halloween. It was fantastic, i've now read all the Jeph Loeb Batman stories. It's a long comic book...

DragonRat
31-05-2006, 09:00 PM
I finished reading Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles. Much better, easier read than...say...Jane Austen. Now onward to finish F. Scott Fitzgerald's Tender Is the Night.

once_dreaded
31-05-2006, 10:42 PM
today....i put my head into an extremely thick book on biology ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~so terrible !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Dude, I love Bio...I have kicked ass in all my Bio classes. Poor you having to READ the book...I just skimmed for terms then went over notes from the teach.

Ranman
15-11-2006, 02:09 PM
I just read a short book. The Fart Book.
Discusses such things as
Where to fart
Who to fart at
How to feel after you fart
A very interesting read

Liam
15-11-2006, 05:20 PM
Picked up a very nice bound and illustrated version of The Art of War by Sun Tzu.

Brilliant stuff.

Swordsman
16-11-2006, 03:47 AM
I recently read Hot Water Music by Charles Bukowski. He immediately became my favorite author. No bullshit for 47 pages about some wall, it's just straight up one sentence, then it's raw emotion and extremely vulgar people. I love it. I'm currently reading Women which is fantastic.

Petit Mademoiselle
16-11-2006, 06:00 PM
I just started reading Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix for the 6th or 7th time :icon_razz

runangl
17-11-2006, 05:52 AM
hmmm... no comment.

I started reading a book on Japanese internment called When the Emperor was Divine. It's actually a unique perspective, really connects you to the characters - even though you never really "meet" them.

seventhson
18-11-2006, 03:36 AM
LED ZEPPELIN THE STORY OF THE BAND AND THEIR MUSIC 1968-1980
by Keith Shadwick (2005)
Learning lots. Have most all their recordings, but inspired to go get more of the artists who influenced them or worked with them, i.e. Jeff Beck, etc. County library lets us check out audio/music CD's for 3weeks at a time, just like a book.
Almost 3/4 done. Hope to finish book Sunday night as it's due back at the public library before 5PM Monday.